Duke University Political Science

  • Publications

    • Aldrich, John H

      • Journal Articles

          • with
          • Paul Abramson, Abraham Disking, Aaron Houck, Renan Levine, Thomas Scotto.
          • "The British General Election of 2010 Under Different Rules."
          • Electoral Studies
          • 32
          • .1
          • (March, 2013)
          • :
          • 134-139.
          • (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.electstud.2012.10.002)
    • Aldrich, John

      • Journal Articles

          • with
          • Michael Munger, Jason Reifler.
          • "Sophisticated and myopic? Citizen Preferences for Electoral College Reform."
          • Public Choice
          • 2013
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 1-18.
          • with
          • Bradford Bishop, Rebecca Hatch, D. Sunshine Hillygus, David W. Rohde.
          • "Blame, Responsibility, and the Tea Party in the 2010 Midterm Elections."
          • Political Behavior
          • (2013)
          • .
          • (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11109-013-9242-4/fulltext.html)
          • with
          • Brittany Perry and Dvid W. Rohde.
          • "House Appropriations after the Republican Revolution."
          • Congress and the Presidency
          • 39
          • .3
          • (September-December, 2012)
          • :
          • 229-253.
          • J.H. Aldrich, J.M. Montgomery and W. Wood.
          • "Turnout as a Habit."
          • Political Behavior
          • 33
          • .4
          • (December, 2011)
          • :
          • 535-563.
          • J.H. Aldrich, T, Shi and J. Liu.
          • "Bifurcated Images of the U.S. in Urban China and the Impact of Media Environment."
          • Political Communication
          • 28
          • .3
          • (July, 2011)
          • :
          • 357-376.
          • with
          • Paul R. Abramson, André Blais, Matthew Diamond, Abraham Diskin, Indridi H. Indridason, Daniel J. Lee, and Renan Levine.
          • "Comparing Strategic Voting Under FPTP and PR."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • 43
          • .1
          • (January, 2010)
          • :
          • 61-90.
          • J.H. Aldrich.
          • "Elinor Ostrom and the ‘just right’ solution."
          • Public Choice
          • 143
          • .3-4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 269-273.
          • with
          • Victoria DeFrancesco Soto; gregory Petrow.
          • "“The Human Face of Economic Globalization: Mexican Migrants and their Support for Free Trade”."
          • Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies
          • 3 (Fall)
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 24-46.
          • J.H. Aldrich.
          • "The Invisible Primary and Its Effects on Democratic Choice."
          • PS: Political Science and Politics
          • 42
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • with
          • Brittany N. Perry, David W. Rohde..
          • "Richard Fenno’s Theory of Congressional Committees and the Partisan Polarization of the House,."
          • Congress Reconsidered, 10th edition.
          • Ed. Lawrence C. Dodd and Bruce I. Oppenheimer.
          • Washington, D.C.:
          • CQ Press,
          • 2013.
          • J.H. Aldrich and Melanie Freeze.
          • "Political Participation, Polarization, and Public Opinion: Activism and the Merging of Partisan and Ideological Polarization."
          • Facing the Challenge of Democracy: Explorations in the Analysis of Public Opinion and Political Participation.
          • Ed. Paul Sniderman and Ben Highton.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2011.
          • with
          • Jeffrey Grynaveski.
          • "Theories of Political Parties."
          • The Oxford Handbook of American Political Parties and Interest Groups.
          • 2010.
          • 21-36.
          • with
          • David Rohde.
          • "Consequences of Electoral and Institutional Change: The Evaluation of Conditional Party Government in the U.S. House of Representatives."
          • New Directions in American Political Parties.
          • Ed. Jeffrey M. Stonecash.
          • Routledge,
          • 2010.
          • 234-250.
          • with
          • Arthur Lupia.
          • "Formal Modeling, Strategic Beahvior, and the Study of American Elections."
          • The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Behavior.
          • Ed. Jan Leighley.
          • 2010.
          • 89-104.
          • with
          • John Griffin.
          • "Parties, Elections, and Democratic Politics."
          • The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Behavior.
          • Ed. Jan Leighley.
          • 2010.
          • 595-610.
          • with
          • Paul Abramson, David W. Rohde.
          • "Studying American Elections."
          • The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Behavior.
          • Ed. Jan Leighley.
          • 2010.
          • 700-715.
      • Books

          • J.H. Aldrich.
          • Why Parties?: A Second look.
          • University of Chicago Press,
          • 2011.
          • P.R. Abramson, J.H. Aldrich, and D.W. Rohde.
          • Change and Continuity in the 2008 and 2010 Elections.
          • CQ Press,
          • 2011.
          • Improving Public Opinion Surveys: Interdisciplinary Innovation and the American National Election Studies.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2011.
          • with
          • Paul Abramson, David W. Rohde.
          • Change and Continuity in the 2008 Elections.
          • CQ Press,
          • 2010.
      • Papers Accepted

          • with
          • Jacob Montgomery, Wendy Wood.
          • "Habit and Turnout."
          • Political Behavior
          • (2010)
          • .
          • with
          • John Griffin.
          • "“Parties, Elections, and Democratic Politics"."
          • ., Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior.
          • 2009.
          • with
          • Arthur Lupia.
          • "Formal Modeling, Strategic Behavior, and the Study of American Elections."
          • Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior.
          • 2009.
          • with
          • Arthur Lupia.
          • "Experiments and Game Theory’s Value to Political Science."
          • Oxford Handbook of Experiments in the Social Sciences.
          • 2009.
          • with
          • Melanie Freeze.
          • "Political Participation, Polarization, and Public Opinion: Activism and the Merging of Partisan and Ideological Polarization."
          • Facing the Challenge of Democracy: Explorations in the Analysis of Public Opinion and Political Participation.
          • Ed. Ben Highton and Paul Sniderman.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2009.
    • Balcells, Laia

      • Chapters in Books

          • L. Balcells.
          • "Political Violence: an institutional approach."
          • Handbook of Comparative Political Institutions.
          • Ed. Jennifer Gandhi and Ruben Ruiz.
          • Routledge Press,
          • 2015.
          • L. Balcells, L. Beehner, and J. Schulhofer-Wohl.
          • "How should we count the war dead in Syria?."
          • Syria and the Islamic State.
          • Ed. Marc Lynch.
          • POMEPS,
          • 2014.
          • [web]
          • L. Balcells & S. Kalyvas.
          • "Technology of Rebellion in the Syrian Civil War."
          • The Political Science of Syria's War.
          • Ed. Marc Lynch.
          • POMEPS Briefings 22,
          • Washington DC:
          • Middle East Channel & Project on Middle East Political Science,
          • December 18, 2013.
          • 11-13.
          • [web]
          • with
          • Lluis Orriols.
          • "Party Polarisation and Spatial Voting in Spain."
          • Voters and Parties in the Spanish Political Space.
          • Ed. Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca and Elias Dinas.
          • 2013.
          • (Reprinted)
      • Other

          • L. Balcells, L. Beehner, J. Schulhofer-Wohl.
          • "How should we count the death in Syria?."
          • The Monkey Cage/Washington Post
          • (2014)
          • .
          • with
          • Stathis N. Kalyvas.
          • "Endgame in Syria?."
          • Foreign Policy
          • (2013)
          • .
          • [web]
          • L. Balcells.
          • "2012 Catalonia Post-Elections Report."
          • The Monkey Cage
          • (November, 2012)
          • .
          • [web]
          • L. Balcells.
          • "2012 Catalonia Pre-Elections Report."
          • The Monkey Cage
          • (November, 2012)
          • .
          • [web]
      • Journal Articles

          • L. Balcells & S. Kalyvas.
          • "Does Warfare Matter? Severity, Duration, and Outcomes of Civil Wars."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 58
          • .8
          • (December 2014)
          • .
          • L. Balcells & P. Justino.
          • "Bridging Micro and Macro Approaches on Civil Wars and Political Violence Issues, Challenges, and the Way Forward."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 58
          • .8
          • (2014)
          • .
          • L. Balcells.
          • "Mass Schooling and Catalan Nationalism."
          • Nationalism and Ethnic Politics
          • 19
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 467-486.
          • with
          • José Fernández-Albertos and Alexander Kuo.
          • ""Economic Crisis, Globalization, and Partisan Bias: Evidence from Spain"."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 57
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 804-816.
          • with
          • Lluís Orriols.
          • ""Party Polarisation and Spatial Voting in Spain"."
          • South European Society and Politics
          • 17
          • .3
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 393-409.
          • L. Balcells.
          • "The Consequences of Victimization on Political Identities. Evidence from Spain."
          • Politics & Society
          • 40
          • .3
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 309-345.
          • L. Balcells.
          • "Continuation of Politics by Two Means: Direct and Indirect Violence in Civil War."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 55
          • .3
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 397-422.
          • with
          • Paloma Aguilar and Héctor Cebolla.
          • ""Determinants of Attitudes towards Transitional Justice"."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • 44
          • .10
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1397-1430.
          • L. Balcells.
          • "Death is in the air: Bombings in Catalonia 1936-1939."
          • Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas
          • 136
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 25-48.
          • with
          • Stathis N. Kalyvas.
          • "International System and Technologies of Rebellion: How the Cold War Shaped Internal Conflict.."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 104
          • .3
          • (August, 2010)
          • :
          • 415-429.
          • (Winner of the 2010 APSA Gregory Luebbert Award to Best Article in Comparative Politics.)
          • L. Balcells.
          • "“Rivalry and Revenge. Violence against Civilians in Conventional Civil Wars.”."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 54
          • .2
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 291-313.
      • Book Reviews

          • L. Balcells.
          • Ariel Ahram’s Proxy Warriors: The Rise and Fall of State Sponsored Militias; Timothy D. Sisk’s International Mediation in Civil Wars. Bargaining with Bullets; Amalendu Misra’s Politics of Civil Wars: Conflict, Intervention and Resolution..
          • Democracy and Security
          • 8
          • .4
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 406-414.
          • L. Balcells.
          • Stathis N. Kalyvas (2006) The Logic of Violence in Civil War. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press..
          • Pôle Sud
          • 30
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 147-149.
          • (In English)
    • Beardsley, Kyle

      • Journal Articles

          • Kyle Beardsley and Nigel Lo.
          • "Third-Party Conflict Management and the Willingness to Make Concessions."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 58
          • .2
          • (2014)
          • :
          • 363-392.
          • [web]
          • Sabrina Karim and Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Allocating Female Peacekeepers Globally: Token Gestures or Informed Policymaking?."
          • International Interactions
          • 39
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 461-488.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "The UN at the Peacemaking-Peacebuilding Nexus."
          • Conflict Management and Peace Science
          • 30
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 369-386.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Using the Right Tool for the Job: Mediator Leverage and Conflict Resolution."
          • Penn State Journal of Law and International Affairs
          • 2
          • .1
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 57-65.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Nigel Lo.
          • "Democratic Communities and Third-Party Conflict Management."
          • Conflict Management and Peace Science
          • 30
          • .1
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 76-93.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "UN Intervention and the Duration of International Crises."
          • Journal of Peace Research
          • 49
          • .2
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 335-349.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Holger Schmidt.
          • "Following the Flag or Following the Charter?: Examining the Determinants of UN Involvement in International Crises, 1945-2002."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 56
          • .1
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 33-49.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Peacekeeping and the Contagion of Armed Conflict."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 73
          • .4
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1051-1064.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Pain, Pressure, and Political Cover: Explaining Mediation Incidence."
          • Journal of Peace Research
          • 47
          • .4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 395-406.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Intervention without Leverage: Explaining the Prevalence of Weak Mediators."
          • International Interactions
          • 35
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 272-297.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Brian McQuinn.
          • "Rebel Groups as Predatory Organizations: The Political Effects of the 2004 Tsunami in Indonesia and Sri Lanka."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 53
          • .4
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 624-645.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Victor Asal.
          • "Nuclear Weapons as Shields."
          • Conflict Management and Peace Science
          • 26
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 235-255.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Victor Asal.
          • "Winning with the Bomb."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 53
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 278-301.
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and Jamus Jerome Lim.
          • "Atoms for Peace, Redux: Energy Codependency for Sustained Cooperation on the Korean Peninsula."
          • Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy
          • 15
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • .
          • [web]
          • Kyle Beardsley and J. Michael Greig.
          • "Disaggregating the Incentives of Conflict Management: An Introduction."
          • International Interactions
          • 35
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 243-248.
          • [web]
      • Chapters in Books

          • Kyle Beardsley and Victor Asal.
          • "Nuclear-Weapons Programs and the Security Dilemma."
          • The Nuclear Renaissance and International Security.
          • Ed. Matt Fuhrmann and Adam Stulberg.
          • Stanford University Press,
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          • Kristian Skrede Gleditsch and Kyle Beardsley.
          • "Issues in Data Collection."
          • The International Studies Encyclopedia.
          • Ed. Robert A. Denemark.
          • Blackwell,
          • 2010.
          • 4705-4725.
          • [web]
      • Books

          • Kyle Beardsley.
          • The Mediation Dilemma.
          • Cornell University Press,
          • 2011.
          • [web]
    • Bermeo, Sarah B

      • Other

          • Sarah Blodgett Bermeo and David Leblang.
          • "Migration and Foreign Aid."
          • April, 2014.
          • (Forthcoming, International Organization)
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          This article explores the theoretical and empirical linkages between migration and the global allocation of foreign development assistance. We argue that the size of the immigrant population from a recipient country residing in a donor country is an important determinant of dyadic aid commitments and we present two complementary hypotheses probing this relationship. First, we argue that donors use foreign aid to achieve their broader immigration goals, targeting migrant sending areas to increase development and decrease the demand for entry into the donor. Second, we hypothesize that migrants already residing in the donor mobilize to lobby for additional aid for their homeland. Empirical tests on a large sample of country pairs comprised of twenty-two donors and more than 150 recipients over the period 1993-2008 show robust support for these hypotheses.

    • Bermeo, Sarah

      • Journal Articles

          • S.B. Bermeo.
          • "Aid is Not Oil: Donor Utility, Heterogeneous Aid, and the Aid-Democratization Relationship."
          • International Organization
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          Recent articles conclude that foreign aid, like other non-tax resources, inhibits political change in authoritarian regimes. This paper challenges both the negative political effects of aid and the similarity of aid to other resources. It develops a model incorporating changing donor preferences and the heterogeneity of foreign aid. Consistent with the model’s predictions, an empirical test for the period 1973-2010 shows that, on average, the negative relationship between aid and the likelihood of democratic change is confined to the cold war period. However, in the post-cold war non-democratic recipients of particular strategic importance can still use aid to thwart change. The relationship between oil revenue and democratic change does not follow the same pattern over time or across recipients. This supports the conclusion that aid has different properties than other, fungible, resources.

          • S. Bermeo.
          • "Foreign Aid and Regime Change: A Role for Donor Intent."
          • World Development
          • 39
          • .11
          • (November, 2011)
          • :
          • 2021-2031.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This paper uses data from the AidData project to analyze the association between foreign aid and the likelihood of democratization in aid recipients. Previous studies have argued that aid can entrench dictatorships, making a transition less likely. I find evidence that the relationship between aid and democratization depends on characteristics of the aid donor. During the period from 1992 to 2007, aid from democratic donors is often found to be associated with an increase in the likelihood of a democratic transition. This is consistent with a scenario in which aid promotes democratization and/or a situation in which democratic donors reward countries that take steps in a democratic direction. In either case, it suggests that democratic donors use scarce aid resources to encourage democracy. During the same period, aid from authoritarian donors exhibits a negative relationship with democratization. This suggests that the source of funding matters, with donor preferences regarding democracy helping to determine the link between aid and democratization.

          • Davis, Christina and Sarah Blodgett Bermeo.
          • "Who Files? Developing Country Participation in GATT/WTO Adjudication (with Christina Davis)."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 71
          • .3
          • (July, 2009)
          • :
          • 1033-1049.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The potential for international law to reduce power asymmetries depends on weaker countries learning to navigate the legal system. This paper examines the use of courts by developing countries to defend their trade interests. Power relations and low capacity may prevent these countries from fully participating in the international trade system. Yet some developing countries have been among the most active participants in GATT/WTO adjudication. We argue that high startup costs for using trade litigation are a barrier to developing country use of the dispute settlement process. Analysis of dispute initiation from 1975 to 2003 shows that past experience in trade adjudication, as either a complainant or a defendant, increases the likelihood that a developing country will initiate disputes. As weaker countries overcome these initial capacity constraints they will increasingly benefit from the international legal structures they have joined.

      • Other Working Papers

          • S.B. Bermeo, David Leblang, Dustin Tingley.
          • "Clowns to the Left of Me, Jokers to the Right: How Donor Partisanship Shapes the Allocation of Foreign Aid."
          • 2011.
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          Recent research emphasizes the role of domestic politics in donor countries in determining foreign aid policy. However, such studies have neglected diff erences between powerful donors that pursue strategic priorities with aid - often generating positive externalities - and smaller donors that free-ride on the public goods created by major power aid. This paper argues that the variation in donor power is particularly important for evaluating the impact of ideology on aid flows. We find that in major powers, where strategic goals are disproportionately important in aid policy, right and left governments give similar amounts of total aid. In other donors, where aid represents more of a welfare transfer from donor to recipient, right governments cut aid budgets. We also fi nd that the right and left do allocate aid di fferently in major powers, with right governments reallocating aid toward more strategically important recipients - the diff erence between parties is in cross-recipient allocation rather than in the overall amount of aid flows in major power donors.

          • S. Bermeo.
          • "A $100 Billion Myth: Lessons for Climate Change Assistance from Sixty Years of ODA."
          • February, 2011.
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          This paper examines the recent commitment by developed countries to allocate $100 billion per year for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing countries. It does so by drawing lessons from the experience of official development assistance. The results of this analysis suggest that a climate funding regime, as currently proposed, fails to avoid many of the problems faced by the existing foreign aid regime. In some cases, the development of parallel structures for climate funding and aid exacerbates existing difficulties, and the failure to integrate development and climate funding foregoes the possibility of significant synergies. An alternate proposal is advanced that seeks to (1) avoid duplication by utilizing existing structures; (2) ensure additionality of funding; (3) measure success by outcomes rather than inputs; and (4) harness the potential of issue linkage between development and climate mechanisms to create incentives for developed states to carry out their commitments toward their developing country counterparts.

          • S.B. Bermeo.
          • "Development and Strategy: Aid Allocation in an Interdependent World."
          • 2010.
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          This paper develops and tests the argument that industrialized countries pursue an agenda of strategic development in their relations with developing countries. In an increasingly interdependent world, wealthy states have an interest in promoting development abroad. This leads them to focus on development, but disproportionately in the poorer states where the benefit from development to the wealthy states is higher. Hypotheses are tested in the area of foreign aid, where evidence is found that donors alter the composition of aid across recipients to account for different levels of government capacity to use aid for development, but also increase the volume of aid flows to developing countries with which they have strong existing connections. The attention to government capacity is new, suggesting that in an interdependent world relations between industrialized and developing countries have evolved, with development promotion becoming an important, strategic goal for industrialized states.

          • "Baskets of Aid: Recipient Characteristics and the Composition of Bilateral Aid."
          • 2009.
    • Brennan, Geoffrey

      • Papers Accepted

          • G. Brennan, J. Anomaly.
          • "markets and economic theory."
          • sage reference encyclopedia for Philosophy in the social sciences.
          • sage,
          • 2012.
          • G. Brennan, D. Moseley.
          • "economics and ethics."
          • International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
          • Hugh La Follette,
          • Wiley/Blackwell,
          • 2012.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "striving for the middle ground."
          • Political Philosophy and Taxation.
          • Ed. M. O'Neill and S. Orr.
          • OUP,
          • 2012.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "keeping company with Seabright."
          • Biological Theory
          • (2012)
          • .
          • G. Brennan.
          • "Political Leadership: A public choice view."
          • Oxford Handbook of Political Leadership.
          • Ed. P. T'Hart and R. Rhodes.
          • OUP,
          • 2012.
          • G. Brennan. M. Brooks.
          • "expressive voting."
          • Elgar Companion to Public Choice.
          • Ed. W. Shugart.
          • edward elgar,
          • 2011.
      • Chapters in Books

          • G. Brennan.
          • "Hume's (Sugden's) Psychopathy."
          • Norms and Values.
          • Ed. M. Baurmann, G. Brennan, R. Goodin N. Southwood.
          • 2011.
          • G. Brennan, M. Brooks.
          • "Institutional and governance aspects of the Henry Tax Review."
          • Australia's Future Tax System.
          • Ed. R. Krever.
          • 2010.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "Commitment to Exchange: the Theologian as Conversationalist."
          • Embracing Grace.
          • Ed. H. Thompson.
          • Barton Books,
          • 2009.
          • 153-166.
          • G. Brennan, G. Eusepi.
          • "Value and Values, Preferences and Prices."
          • The Ethics of Economics and the Economics of Ethics.
          • Ed. G. Brennan and G. Eusepi.
          • Edward Elgar,
          • 2009.
          • 14-31.
          • G. Brennan, A. Hamlin.
          • "Positive Constraints on Normative Political Theory."
          • The Ethcs of Economics and the Economics of Ethics.
          • Ed. G. Brennan and G. Eusepi.
          • Edward Elgar,
          • 2009.
          • 106-130.
          • G. Brennan, A. Hamlin.
          • "Bygones are Bygones."
          • Perspectives in Moral Science.
          • Ed. M. Baurmann, B. Lahno.
          • Nomos Verlag,
          • 2009.
          • 157-175.
          • G. Brennan, M. Baurmann, R. Goodin, N. Southwood.
          • "What the Voter Needs to Know."
          • Relaibale Knowledge and Social Epistemology.
          • Ed. G. Schurz, M Werning.
          • Graxer Philosophisce Studien,
          • 2009.
      • Journal Articles

          • G. Brennan., M. Brooks.
          • "on the cashing-out hypothesis and hard and soft policies."
          • european Journal of law and economics
          • 27
          • .4
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 601-610.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "PPE: An Institutional View."
          • Politics/Philosophy/Economics
          • 9
          • .4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 379-397.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "The Division of Epistemic Labour"."
          • Analys und Kritik
          • 32
          • .2
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 231-246.
          • G. Brennan, M. Brooks.
          • "revenue risk and revenue timing."
          • Tax Research Forum
          • 24
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 89-109.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "Hobbes' Samuel."
          • Public Choice
          • 141
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 5-12.
          • G. Brennan.
          • "climate change: a rational choice politics view."
          • Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics
          • 53
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 305-322.
      • Edited Volumes

          • G. Brennan, M. Baurmann, R. Goodin, N. Southwood, eds.
          • Norms and Values: The Role of Social Norms as Instruments of Value realization.
          • Nomos Verlag,
          • 2010.
          • G. Brennan, G. Eusepi, eds.
          • The Ethics of Economics and the Economics of Ethics.
          • Edward Elgar,
          • 2009.
    • Buthe, Tim

      • Journal Articles

          • Tim Büthe and Helen V. Milner.
          • "Institutional Diversity in Trade Agreements and Their Effect on Foreign Direct Investment: Credibility, Commitments, and Economic Flows in the Developing World, 1971-2007."
          • World Politics
          • 66
          • .1
          • (January, 2014)
          • :
          • 88-122.
          Publication Description

          International trade agreements lead to more foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. We examine the causal mechanisms underpinning this trade-investment linkage by asking whether institutional features of preferential trade agreements (PTAs), which allow governments to make more credible commitments to protect foreign investments, indeed result in greater FDI. We explore three such institutional differences. We first examine whether PTAs that have entered into force lead to greater FDI than PTAs that have merely been negotiated and signed since only the former constitute a binding commitment under international law. Second, do trade agreements that have investment clauses lead to greater FDI? Third, do PTAs with dispute settlement mechanisms lead to greater FDI? Analyses of FDI flows into 122 developing countries from 1971 to 2007 show that more FDI is induced by trade agreements that include stronger mechanisms for credible commitment. Institutional diversity in international agreements matters.

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Agent-Centric Historical Institutionalism as a Theory of Institutional Change: The Politics of Regulating Competition and Mergers in the European Union, 1955-2010."
          • International Organization
          • 68
          • (2014 (forthcoming))
          • .
          Publication Description

          This paper examines the striking transformation of the European Commission from a weak antitrust regulator with no authority to regulate mergers into an extremely powerful, unambiguously supranational regulator of market competition, with broad authority to review and impose conditions upon or even prohibit mergers. To explain this institutional development, which was not intended by the member states and opposed by the largest, most powerful ones, I put forward an actor-centric historical institutionalist theory. It emphasizes institutional feedbacks from economic integration to the preferences of sub- and transnational private actors—actors that treat the broader institutional context as a political opportunity structure. This allows me to specify the conditions under which these actors' pursuit of their private, often commercial interests incrementally leads to supranational market regulation. The theoretical framework also recognizes that institutional change—such as establishing supranational authority—has opponents as well as supporters and identifies the conditions under which the latter are more likely to succeed. Actor-centric historical institutionalism thus can explain institutional changes in the international political economy that take place without directly involvement by, and even contrary to the preferences for autonomy of, powerful states.

          • Tim Büthe, Solomon Major, and Andre de Mello e Souza.
          • "The Politics of Private Foreign Aid: Humanitarian Principles, Economic Development Objectives, and Organizational Interests in the Allocation of Private Aid by NGOs."
          • International Organization
          • 66
          • .4
          • (Fall, 2012)
          • :
          • 571-607.
          Publication Description

          A large and increasing share of international humanitarian and development aid is raised from non-governmental sources, allocated by transnational NGOs. We know little about this private foreign aid, not even how it is distributed across recipient countries, much less what explains the allocation. This paper presents an original dataset, based on detailed financial records from most of the major U.S.-based humanitarian and development NGOs, which allows us for the first time to map and analyze the allocation of U.S. private aid. We find no support for the common claim that aid NGOs systematically prioritize their organizational self-interest when they allocate private aid, and we find only limited support for the hypothesis that expected aid effectiveness drives aid allocation. By contrast, we find strong support for the argument that the deeply rooted humanitarian discourse within and among aid NGOs drives their aid allocation, consistent with a view of aid NGOs as principled actors and constructivist theories of international relations. Recipients' humanitarian need is substantively and statistically the most significant determinant of U.S. private aid allocation (beyond a regional effect in favor of Latin American countries). Materialist concerns do not crowd out ethical norms among these NGOs.

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Private Regulation in the Global Economy: A (P)Review."
          • Business and Politics
          • 12
          • .3
          • (October, 2010)
          • :
          • Art.2.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This introduction to the special issue combines a review of the existing literature about the causes and consequences of private regulation in the global economy with a preview of the articles in this issue. To organize this (p)review, I introduce a conceptual model “beyond supply and demand,” which distinguishes three major subsets of stakeholders of global private regulation, which may (but need not) overlap: the political actors who call for private regulation, the rule-makers who provide such governance for the global economy, and what I call the “targets” of the private regulations, who are supposed to behave according to these private rules. I then highlight the three core questions addressed by the contributions to the special issue: (1) How do private bodies attain regulatory authority; why do private regulators provide governance; and why do the targets of the rules comply? (2) Who governs the global economy through private regulations? And (3) what are the effects of private regulation, and how does the rise of private regulation affect public regulatory authority and capacity?

          Guest editor's introduction to 11-article special issue on "Private Regulation in the Global Economy"

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Engineering Uncontestedness? The Origin and Institutional Development of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)."
          • Business & Politics
          • 12
          • .3
          • (October, 2010)
          • :
          • Art.4.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Private regulation often entails competition among multiple rule-makers, but private rules and regulators do not always compete. For substantial parts of the global economy, a single private body (per issue) is recognized as the focal point for global rule-making. The selection of the institutional setting here effectively takes place prior to drawing up the specific rules, with important consequences for the politics of regulating global markets. In this paper, I develop a theoretical explanation for how a private transnational organization may attain such preeminence—how it can become the focal point for rule-making—in its area of expertise. I emphasize the transnational body's capacity to pursue its organizational self-interest, as well as timing and sequence. I then examine empirically a particularly important body of this kind, which today is essentially uncontested as the focal point for private regulation in its area, even though its standards often have substantial distributive implications: the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). I analyze the persistence and changes in the IEC's formal rules or procedures and informal norms, as well as the broadening scope of its regulatory authority and membership over more than a century.

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Global Private Politics: A Research Agenda."
          • Business & Politics
          • 12
          • .3
          • (October, 2010)
          • :
          • Art.12.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In this concluding essay to the special issue on Private Regulation in the Global Economy, I review the main findings, focused on the answers that the papers in this issue jointly suggest to the three sets of core questions noted in the introductory essay: (1) How do private bodies attain regulatory authority? Why do private regulators provide governance and why do the targets of these rules comply? (2) Who governs? Who are the key actors in private regulation and what are their motivations? (3) What is the effect of the rise of private regulation on public regulatory authority and capacity? I then identify and discuss several key issues to develop a research agenda for what I call “global private politics.”

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "The Evolution of Supranational Antitrust Enforcement and Control of Government Subsidies in the EU."
          • New Global Law and Policy
          • 2
          • .2
          • (July, 2009)
          • :
          • 181-206.
      • Book Reviews

          • Tim Büthe.
          • Review of Randall W. Stone, Controlling Institutions: International Organizations and the Global Economy.
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 11
          • .1
          • (March, 2013)
          • :
          • 282-284.
          • Tim Büthe.
          • Andrew Walter, 'Governing Finance: East Asia's Adoption of International Standards' (book review).
          • Political Science Quarterly
          • 124
          • .2
          • (Summer, 2009)
          • :
          • 376-379.
      • Chapters in Books

          • Tim Büthe and Cindy Cheng.
          • "Private Transnational Governance of Economic Development: International Development Aid."
          • Handbook of Global Economic Governance.
          • Ed. Manuel Moschella and Catherine Weaver. .
          • London: Routledge,
          • 2013.
          • 322-341.
          Publication Description

          This chapter examines the role of private actors in raising, allocating, and implementing international development aid (understood as resources supposedly intended to lastingly improve the well-being of individuals and groups in another country). Private individuals and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have long been important actors in the transnational governance of economic development through aid. Yet some, such as foundations providing funds for development projects in other countries, have become much more prominent in international development during the last two decades while others, such as NGOs, have become far more numerous or have taken on new roles. we organize our discussion around a distinction between four different kinds of new actors (or actors who have taken on new roles): (1) transnational NGOs as a channel of delivery for public (governmental) development aid; (2) transnational aid NGOs as agenda-setters; (3) foundations and other private sources of development aid; (4) transnational aid NGOs as private providers of privately funded aid. For each of them, we discuss the sources of their power and influence and examine how ideas about development and aid have shaped the rise of these new players, identifying throughout promising and important areas for future research. In the final section, we consider peer-to-peer development aid and related innovative attempts to solve pervasive accountability problems in development aid. Our review of the research frontier on this issue suggests: Increasingly, an analysis of global economic governance through development aid without attention to private players is not just incomplete but is likely to result in biased analyses and misguided policy advice.

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Institutionalization and Its Consequences: The Transnational Legal Order for Food Safety."
          • Transnational Legal Orders.
          • Ed. Terence Halliday and Gregory Shaffer. .
          • New York: Cambridge University Press,
          • 2014 (forthcoming).
          Publication Description

          This chapter analyzes the institutionalization of the transnational legal order(s) for the safety of internationally traded agricultural goods for human consumption ("food safety"). Today, in the public realm, the TLO for trade-related food safety is jointly underpinned by two international organizations (and their rules and procedures): the World Trade Organization, WTO, on the basis of the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Measures, and the Codex Alimentarius Commission, a hybrid public-private body jointly created by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization. Following Halliday and Shaffer, I ask first: Does Codex Alimentarius standard-setting under the SPS-Agreement meet the definition of a TLO? I find that it does. But what exactly is being ordered by this TLO for food safety? Each TLO corresponds to an issue area, i.e., an issue or behavior that allegedly "need[s] to be addressed transnationally" to avoid problems or undesirable consequences for some stakeholders (Halliday and Shaffer 2013:37). Before we can assess how well the legal and geographic scope of the TLO fit the issue as conceived by the actors at the time, it is necessary to establish how the issue came to be understood as it was understood by those actors at that time. I will therefore examine in this chapter the development of food aid as a distinct issue in need of transnational ordering, including how food aid came to be seen as a trade issue, keeping in mind that the conceptual, legal, and geographic boundaries of both the issue and the TLO are socially and politically constructed, and it is highly likely that there is some recursivity between the two processes.

          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Beyond Supply and Demand: A Political-Economic Conceptual Model."
          • Governance by Indicators: Global Power through Quantification and Rankings.
          • Ed. Kevin Davis, Angelina Fisher, Benedict Kingsbury, and Sally Engle Merry.
          • New York:
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2012.
          • 29-51.
          • Tim Büthe and Nathaniel Harris.
          • "The Codex Alimentarius Commission: A Hybrid Public-Private Regulator."
          • Handbook on Transnational Governance: New Institutions and Innovations.
          • Ed. Thomas Hale and David Held. .
          • Cambridge:
          • Polity Press,
          • 2011.
          • 219-228.
          • Tim Büthe.
          • "The Power of Norms; the Norms of Power: Who Governs International Electrical and Electronic Technology?."
          • Who Govern the Globe?.
          • Ed. Deborah D. Avant, Martha Finnemore, and Susan K. Sell. .
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 292-232.
          Publication Description

          This article/chapter analyzes the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) as a "global governor." Founded in 1906 by the nascent professional associations of electrical engineers from nine countries, the IEC was set up to help its members coordinate on common terms, symbols, and basic measurements for science and the emerging field of electrical engineering. Today, the IEC is the clear focal point for international electrotechnical standard-setting. Its more than 5,000 standards govern research methods, product designs, and purchase specifications across a broad range of industries and are frequently incorporated into laws and regulations in many of the hundred-fifty countries in which the IEC has member bodies or affiliates. In the first half of this chapter, I describe and explain the remarkable institutional evolution of this international nongovernmental organization over the past century. I identify functional incentives for the increased scope and geographic reach of IEC governance, but institutional change from 1906 to 2008 was ultimately a political process, driven by specific actors pursuing their particular interests. Internationally competitive firms have often pushed for broadening the scope of international standardization since it reduces non-tariff barriers and integrates markets. And the IEC, as a non-governmental international organization, has at times been an actor itself, augmenting its expertise-based authority by developing formal and informal institutions, increasing effectiveness and efficiency, and getting governments to delegate international standard-setting functions to the IEC. In the second half of the chapter, I put IEC standard-setting (that is, transnational rule-making) into the context of the broader governance sequence: agenda-setting, rule-making, implementation, monitoring, and enforcement. For each of these activities, I identify the key groups with a stake in IEC governance, their motivations and resources, and why they do or do not play a role as "governors." I argue and show that the key characters at each stage in this process differ greatly. The answer to Dahl's deceptively simple question, "Who Governs?," therefore depends upon the stage of the governance sequence, but I find that formal and informal institutions at the domestic (as well as at the international) level generally determine who the main actors are at each stage of the governance sequence and what kinds of power resources they can use to exert influence in this realm of global private politics.

          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • "Standards for Global Markets: Domestic and International Institutions for Setting International Product Standards."
          • Handbook on Multi-Level Governance.
          • Ed. Henrik Enderlein, Sonja Wälti, and Michael Zürn. .
          • Edward Elgar,
          • 2010.
          • 455-476.
          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • "International Standards-Setting Bodies."
          • Oxford Handbook on Business and Government.
          • Ed. David Coen, Graham Wilson and Wyn Grant. .
          • Oxford and New York:
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 440-471.
          • Tim Büthe.
          • "Technical Standards as Public and Club Goods? Financing the International Accounting Standards Board."
          • Voluntary Programs: A Club Theory Approach.
          • Ed. Matthew Potoski and Aseem Prakash. .
          • MIT Press,
          • 2009.
          • 157-179.
          • Tim Büthe.
          • "The Politics of Food Safety in the Age of Global Trade: The Codex Alimentarius Commission in the SPS-Agreement of the WTO."
          • Import Safety: Regulatory Governance in the Global Economy.
          • Ed. Cary Coglianese, Adam Finkel, and David Zaring. .
          • University of Pennsylvania Press,
          • 2009.
          • 88-109.
          • Tim Büthe and Helen V. Milner.
          • "Bilateral Investment Treaties and Foreign Direct Invest: A Political Analysis."
          • The Effect of Treaties on Foreign Direct Investment: Bilateral Investment Treaties, Double Taxation Treaties, and Investment Flows.
          • Ed. Karl P. Sauvant and Lisa E. Sachs. .
          • Oxford and New York:
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
          • 171-224.
      • Other

          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • "The Privatization of Regulation in Global Markets: Winners and Losers in the Private Governance of Financial and Product Markets."
          • World Financial Review
          • (September/October, 2011)
          • :
          • 66-69.
          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • "Mehr deutscher Einfluss auf die Bilanzierungsregeln?."
          • Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
          • (May 30, 2011)
          • :
          • 14.
          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • "The Privatization of Regulation in the World Economy."
          • RegBlog: Regulatory News, Analysis, and Opinion
          • (May 25, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
      • Books

          • Tim Büthe and Walter Mattli.
          • New Global Rulers: The Privatization of Regulation in the World Economy.
          • Princeton:
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2011.
          Publication Description

          Over the past two decades, governments have delegated extensive regulatory authority to international private-sector organizations. This internationalization and privatization of rule making has been motivated not only by the economic benefits of common rules for global markets, but also by the realization that government regulators often lack the expertise and resources to deal with increasingly complex and urgent regulatory tasks. The New Global Rulers examines who writes the rules in international private organizations, as well as who wins, who loses--and why. The book examines three powerful global private regulators: the International Accounting Standards Board, which develops financial reporting rules used by corporations in more than a hundred countries; and the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission, which account for 85 percent of all international product standards. Büthe and Mattli offer both a new framework for understanding global private regulation and detailed empirical analyses of such regulation based on multi-country, multi-industry business surveys. They find that global rule making by technical experts is highly political, and that even though rule making has shifted to the international level, domestic institutions remain crucial. Influence in this form of global private governance is not a function of the economic power of states, but of the ability of domestic standard-setters to provide timely information and speak with a single voice. Büthe and Mattli show how domestic institutions' abilities differ, particularly between the two main standardization players, the United States and Europe.

    • Charney, Evan

      • Journal Articles

          • E. Charney.
          • "Can Tasks be Inherently Boring? Commentary on Robert Kurzban, Angela Duckworth, Joseph W. Kable, and Justus Myers, “An Opportunity Cost Model of Subjective Effort and Task Performance"."
          • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • 36
          • .6
          • (December, 2013)
          • :
          • 684.
          Publication Description

          Kurzban et al. argue that the experiences of “effort,” “boredom,” and “fatigue” are indications that the costs of a task outweigh its benefits. Reducing the costs of tasks to “opportunity costs” has the effect of rendering tasks costless and of denying that they can be inherently boring or tedious, something that “vigilance tasks” were intentionally designed to be.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Politics and Biology."
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 11
          • .2
          • (June, 2013)
          • :
          • 588-61.
          • [web]
          • E. Charney and W. English.
          • "Genopolitics and the Science of Genetics."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 107
          • .2
          • (May, 2013)
          • :
          • 382-395.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In an earlier article we challenged the findings of Fowler and Dawes (FD) that two genes predict voter turnout as part of a more general critique of “genopolitics.” FD now acknowledge that their finding of a “significant” direct association between MAOA and voting was incorrect, but claim to have replicated their finding of an “indirect” association between 5HTT, self-reported church attendance, and self-reported voting. We show that this finding is likely driven by population stratification and omitted variable bias. We then explain why, from the standpoints of genetics, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology, genopolitics is a fundamentally misguided undertaking; we also respond to FD’s charge that some of our previous statements concerning genetics are “highly misleading,” “extremely disingenuous,” and “even incorrect.” We show that their criticisms demonstrate a lack of awareness of some basic principles in genetics and of discoveries in molecular genetics over the past 50 years.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Conservatives, liberals, and "the negative": Commentary on John R. Hibbing, Kevin B. Smith, and John R. Alford, "Differences in Negativity Bias Underlie Variations in Political Ideology"."
          • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • (Forthcoming)
          • .
          • E. Charney.
          • "Behavioural genetics in the postgenomic era."
          • eLS, John Wiley & Sons
          • (Forthcoming)
          • .
          Publication Description

          There is growing evidence that the complexity of higher organisms does not correlate with the “complexity” of the genome (the human genome contains fewer protein coding genes than corn, and many genes are preserved across species). Rather, complexity is associated with the complexity of the pathways and processes whereby the cell utilizes the DNA molecule, and much else, in the process of phenotype formation. These processes include the activity of the epigenome, non-coding RNAs, alternative splicing, and post-translational modifications. Not accidentally, all of these processes appear to be of particular importance for the human brain, the most complex organ in nature. Because these processes can be highly environmentally reactive, they are a key to understanding behavioural plasticity and highlight the importance of the developmental process in explaining behavioural outcomes.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Cytoplasmic Inheritance Redux."
          • Advances in Child Behavior and Development
          • 44
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 225-55.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Since the early twentieth century, inheritance was seen as the inheritance of genes. Concurrent with the acceptance of the genetic theory of inheritance was the rejection of the idea that the cytoplasm of the oocyte could also play a role in inheritance and a corresponding devaluation of embryology as a discipline critical for understand- ing human development. Development, and variation in development, came to be viewed solely as matters of genetic inheritance and genetic variation. We now know that inheritance is a matter of both genetic and cytoplasmic inheritance. A growing awareness of the centrality of the cytoplasm in explaining both human development and phenotypic variation has been promoted by two contemporaneous develop- ments: the continuing elaboration of the molecular mechanisms of epigenetics and the global rise of artificial reproductive technologies. I review recent developments in the ongoing elaboration of the role of the cytoplasm in human inheritance and development.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Behavior genetics and postgenomics."
          • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • 35
          • .6
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 331-58.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The science of genetics is undergoing a paradigm shift. Recent discoveries, including the activity of retrotransposons, the extent of copy number variations, somatic and chromosomal mosaicism, and the nature of the epigenome as a regulator of DNA expressivity, are challenging a series of dogmas concerning the nature of the genome and the relationship between genotype and phenotype. DNA, once held to be the unchanging template of heredity, now appears subject to a good deal of environmental change; considered to be identical in all cells and tissues of the body, there is growing evidence that somatic mosaicism is the normal human condition; and treated as the sole biological agent of heritability, we now know that the epigenome, which regulates gene expressivity, can be inherited via the germline. These developments are particularly significant for behavior genetics for at least three reasons: First, these phenomena appear to be particularly prevalent in the human brain, and likely are involved in much of human behavior; second, they have important implications for the validity of heritability and gene association studies, the methodologies that largely define the discipline of behavior genetics; and third, they appear to play a critical role in development during the perinatal period, and in enabling phenotypic plasticity in offspring in particular. I examine one of the central claims to emerge from the use of heritability studies in the behavioral sciences, the principle of “minimal shared maternal effects,” in light of the growing awareness that the maternal perinatal environment is a critical venue for the exercise of adaptive phenotypic plasticity. This consideration has important implications for both developmental and evolutionary biology

          • E. Charney and W. English.
          • "Candidate Genes and Political Behavior."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 106
          • .1
          • (February, 2012)
          • :
          • 1-34.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Political scientists are making increasing use of the methodologies of behavior genetics in an attempt to uncover whether or not political behavior is heritable, as well as the specific genotypes that might act as predisposing factors for—or predictors of—political “phenotypes.” Noteworthy among the latter are a series of candidate gene association studies in which researchers claim to have discovered one or two common genetic variants that predict such behaviors as voting and political orientation. We critically examine the candidate gene association study methodology by considering, as a representative example, the recent study by Fowler and Dawes according to which “two genes predict voter turnout.” In addition to demonstrating, on the basis of the data set employed by Fowler and Dawes, that two genes do not predict voter turnout, we consider a number of difficulties, both methodological and genetic, that beset the use of gene association studies, both candidate and genome-wide, in the social and behavioral sciences.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Humans, Fruit Flies, and Automatons."
          • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • 35
          • .5
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 381-410.
          • E. Charney.
          • "Physiology may not be (political) destiny."
          • PsyCrit
          • (February, 2009)
          • .
      • Op-eds

          • E. Charney.
          • "Still Chasing Ghosts: A New Genetic Methodology Will Not Find the “Missing Heritability”."
          • Independent Science News
          • (September 19, 2013)
          • .
          • [web]
          • E. Charney and W. English.
          • "The Voting Gene."
          • Scientific American
          • 307
          • .5
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 14.
      • Chapters in Books

          • E. Charney.
          • "Genetics and the Life Course."
          • Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.
          • Forthcoming.
          Publication Description

          A life course perspective is committed to the proposition that from conception to death, all human outcomes are the result of a continual interaction between the individual and all of the environments that he or she inhabits at any given point in time. Early development is a critical period, a window of time during the life course when a given exposure can have a critical or permanent influence on later outcomes. But the impact of exposures upon outcomes does not end at any specific point in time, inasmuch as life is a continuing interactive and adaptive process. We now know that what applies to human beings, also applies to their genomes. The “outcome” of any gene at any given point in time (whether or not it is used to transcribe a particular protein, what form of that protein, and how much) is a product of the interaction between the gene and the multiple environments of which it is a part, which includes the epigenome, the cell, the biological human, and the assorted environments he or she occupies (e.g., geographical, socio-economic, ethnic, etc.). Early life experiences can permanently “reprogram” the epigenome and gene transcription with life-long behavioral consequences. At the same time, the epigenome as well as the genome continue to be environmentally responsive throughout the life course.

          • E. Charney.
          • "Gene Association Studies."
          • Biotechnology in Our Lives.
          • Ed. Sheldon Krimsky and Jeremy Gruber.
          • New York, NY:
          • Skyhorse,
          • 2013.
          • E. Charney.
          • "Political Science and Behavior Genetics: Rethinking Foundational Assumptions."
          • Biology and Politics: The Cutting Edge.
          • 2011.
          • E. Charney.
          • "Political Ethics."
          • International Encyclopedia of Political Science.
          • Ed. George T. Kurian.
          • CQ Press,
          • January, 2010.
          • E. Charney.
          • "Political Correctness; Faith-Based Initiatives; Flag Desecration."
          • Encyclopedia of the Culture Wars.
          • Ed. Roger Chapman.
          • M.E. Sharpe,
          • December, 2009.
    • Downes, Alexander B.

      • Journal Articles

          • A.B. Downes.
          • "The Myth of Choosy Democracies: Examining the Selection Effects Theory of Democratic Victory in War."
          • H-Diplo | ISSF Essays
          • (January, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
    • Downes, Alexander

      • Journal Articles

          • A.B. Downes and M.L. Lilley.
          • "Overt Peace, Covert War? Covert Intervention and the Democratic Peace."
          • Security Studies
          • 19
          • .2
          • (June, 2010)
          • :
          • 366-406.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Proponents and critics of the democratic peace have debated the extent to which covert attempts by democracies to overthrow other elected governments are consistent with or contradict democratic peace theory. The existing debate, however, fails to acknowledge that there are multiple democratic peace theories, and that inter-democratic covert intervention might have different implications for different arguments. In this paper, we first distill hypotheses regarding covert foreign regime change from the major norms and institutions theories of democratic peace. Relying primarily on declassified government documents, we then investigate these hypotheses in the context of U.S. covert intervention in Chile (1970-73). The evidence suggests that covert intervention is highly inconsistent with norms and checks-and-balances theories of democratic peace. The evidence is more consistent with selectorate theory, but questions remain because democratic leaders engaged in interventions with a low likelihood of success and a high likelihood that failure would be publicized, which would constitute exactly the type of policy failure that democratic executives supposedly avoid.

          • A.B. Downes.
          • "Correspondence: Another Skirmish in the Battle over Democracies and War."
          • International Security
          • 34
          • .2
          • (Fall, 2009)
          • .
          • A.B. Downes.
          • "How Smart and Tough Are Democracies? Reassessing Theories of Democratic Victory in War."
          • International Security
          • 33
          • .4
          • (Spring, 2009)
          • :
          • 9-51.
      • Papers Submitted

          • A.B. Downes and K.M. Cochran.
          • "It's a Crime, but Is It a Blunder? The Efficacy of Targeting Civilians in War."
          • 2010.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Is systematically targeting an adversary’s civilians in war an effective military strategy? This paper assesses the impact of civilian victimization on interstate war outcomes from 1816 to 2007. Although targeting civilians is positively correlated with victory, this general finding is misleading. In fact, there are two distinct types of civilian victimization: coercive victimization—in which a belligerent targets an adversary’s civilians to persuade their government to surrender—and eliminationist victimization—where a belligerent removes members of a target group from a piece of territory it wishes to annex from another state. Coercive targeting is effective only when used against anocracies, but case evidence suggests that it plays a role only when the target state is essentially militarily defeated. Countries that employ eliminationist victimization are more likely to win, but this is primarily because conquering territory is often a prerequisite for implementing this type of strategy. Thus, states are already winning when they engage in this type of victimization. Once we correct for endogeneity, the relationship between eliminationist targeting and victory disappears.

          • A.B. Downes and J. Monten.
          • "FIRCed to be Free: Foreign-Imposed Regime Change and Democratization."
          • 2010.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Scholars and policymakers are increasingly interested in the question of whether sustainable democratic institutions can be imposed through military intervention, but appear to be arriving at opposite conclusions. The Bush administration, for example, cited the successful precedents of Germany and Japan after World War II in making the case for democratizing Afghanistan and Iraq. Leading academic studies of the effect of military intervention on democracy, by contrast, find that such interventions on average do little to enhance democracy. Some scholars argue that this is no accident because democratic leaders have few incentives to install democratic systems in other countries, preferring instead to impose a dictator who is responsive to the external intervener’s interests rather than the whims of his domestic public. Existing studies, however, define intervention too broadly. If the key question is whether sustainable democratic institutions can be imposed by military means, then the theoretically appropriate cases are those in which an intervener uses force to change the ruler and/or political institutions of the target state. In this paper, therefore, we examine the effect of one hundred instances of foreign-imposed regime change (FIRC) on the ensuing level of democracy in targets between 1816 and 2008. Our findings corroborate and extend those of previous studies: FIRC by democracies on average leaves the Polity scores of targets unchanged, even after accounting for selection effects in where states choose to intervene via matching techniques. Targets of democratic FIRCs remain firmly entrenched in the autocratic camp. Foreign-imposed regime change by democracies, however, does have a positive effect on democratization in states that are relatively wealthy or ethnically homogeneous; it has a negative effect on poor or heterogeneous states.

          • A.B. Downes.
          • "Catastrophic Success: Foreign-Imposed Regime Change and Civil War."
          • 2010.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Foreign-imposed regime change (FIRC) has been argued to have a pacifying effect on interstate relations: when a victorious power changes the composition of its defeated rival’s government, a recurrence of armed conflict between them becomes very rare. Yet the domestic effects within states that experience FIRC may be less benign. This paper investigates the extent to which FIRC might be a form of “catastrophic success,” dampening international conflict but exacerbating internal conflict. My analysis differentiates between FIRCs that bring entirely new leaders to power versus those that restore a recently overthrown ruler to office. I argue that the former disrupts state power and foments grievances and resentments, whereas the latter does not. Analyzing a dataset of country-years from 1816 to 2008 that includes one hundred FIRCs, I find that only new leader FIRC significantly increases the risk of civil war in the short-term aftermath. New leader FIRC is also especially damaging to the prospects for domestic peace when it is inflicted in conjunction with defeat in an interstate war, and in poor or ethnically heterogeneous countries.

      • Chapters in Books

          • A.B. Downes and K.M. Cochran.
          • "Targeting Civilians to Win? Assessing the Military Effectiveness of Civilian Victimization in Interstate War."
          • Rethinking Violence: States and Non-State Actors in Conflict.
          • Ed. E. Chenoweth and A. Lawrence.
          • MIT Press,
          • 2010.
          • [web]
      • Book Reviews

          • A.B. Downes.
          • Review of Hugo Slim, Killing Civilians: Method, Madness, and Morality in War.
          • Journal of Strategic Studies
          • 32
          • .6
          • (December, 2009)
          • .
          • A.B. Downes.
          • Review of Michael C. Desch, Power and Military Effectiveness: The Fallacy of Democratic Triumphalism.
          • Political Science Quarterly
          • 124
          • .2
          • (Summer, 2009)
          • :
          • 342-44.
    • Eldridge, Albert F

      • Other

          • A.F. Eldridge.
          • "None."
          • none
          • none.
          • (2009)
          • .
    • Feaver, Peter D.

      • Other

          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "What do Policymakers Want From Academic Experts on Nuclear Proliferation?."
          • MonkeyCage, WashingonPost.com
          • (July 8, 2014)
          • .
    • Feaver, Peter

      • Other

          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Penalty Box: How Sanctions Trap Policymakers."
          • ForeignAffairs.com
          • (June 6, 2014)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Shadow Government."
          • ForeignPolicy.Com
          • (2014)
          • .
          Publication Description

          I co-moderated the Shadow Government Blog hosted on ForeignPolicy.com. According to the FP editors, this is the blog that receives the highest amount of traffic from the White House and State Department. This past year, I wrote scores of posts myself (most of op-ed length) and edited hundreds of blogposts submitted by my team.

          • P.D. Feaver, James Golby, and Kyle Dropp.
          • "The Public Listens to Generals."
          • Cleveland Plain Dealer
          • (April 9, 2013)
          • .
          Publication Description

          Also printed in Providence journal, April 18, 2013

          • P.D. Feaver and Christopher Gelpi.
          • "Hagel and the Veteran Effect: Service Tempers Views on the Use of Force."
          • TheDailyBeast.com
          • (February 12, 2013)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Shadow Government."
          • 2013.
          Publication Description

          I co-moderated the Shadow Government Blog hosted on ForeignPolicy.com. According to the FP editors, this is the blog that receives the highest amount of traffic from the White House and State Department. This past year, I wrote scores of posts myself (most of op-ed length) and edited hundreds of blogposts submitted by my team.

          • P.D. Feaver, James Golby, Heidi Urben, and Kyle Dropp.
          • ""Brass Politics: How Retired Military Officers are Shaping Elections"."
          • ForeignAffairs.com
          • (November 5, 2012)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Eight Myths about American Grand Strategy."
          • Forging American Grand Strategy: Securing a Path Through A Complex Future.
          • Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College,
          • October, 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver and Kenneth Geers.
          • "When the Urgency of Time and Circumstances Clearly Does not Permit: Predelegation in Nuclear and Cyber Scenarios."
          • Cyber Analogies.
          • Ed. John Arquilla and Emily Goldman.
          • forthcoming 2014.
          • P.D. Feaver and Charles Miller.
          • "Provocations on Policymakers, Casualty Aversion, and Post-Heroic Warfare."
          • Heroism and the Changing Character of War: Toward Post-Heroic Warfare?.
          • Ed. Sibylle Scheipers.
          • Palgrave,
          • 2014 forthcoming.
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • ""Has the Obama Response to the Arab Revolutions Been Effective? Yes, Not Really, and Probably Too Soon to Tell"."
          • The Arab Revolutions and American Policy.
          • Aspen Strategy Group,
          • 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver and Stephen Biddle.
          • ""Assessing Strategic Choices in the War on Terror"."
          • How 9/11 Changed our Ways of War.
          • Sanford University Press,
          • 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "“Nuclear Command and Control in Crisis: Old Lessons from New History.”."
          • Nuclear Weapons Security Crises: What Does History Teach?.
          • Ed. Henry Sokolski and Bruno Tertrais.
          • Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College,
          • 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver, Kristin Sharp.
          • ""The Ultimate Balancing Act: Democratic Governance and Nuclear Policy in the United States,"."
          • Governing the Bomb: Civilian Control and Democratic Accountability of Nuclear Weapons.
          • 2010.
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • ""Domestic Politics and the Long War"."
          • Lessons of the Long War.
          • Ed. Thomas Donnelly.
          • AEI,
          • 2010.
          • P.D. Feaver, E Seeler.
          • "Before and After Huntington: The Methodological Maturing of Civil-Military Studies."
          • American Civil-Military Relations: Realities and Challenges.
          • Johns Hopkins Press,
          • 2009.
          • P.D. Feaver and W. Inboden.
          • "“What Was the Point of SPIR? Strategic Planning in National Security at the White House,”."
          • Avoiding Trivia: The Role of Strategic Planning in American Foreign Policy.
          • Ed. Daniel Drezner.
          • Brookings,
          • 2009.
      • Monographs

          • P.D. Feaver, James Golby, and Kyle Dropp.
          • Listening to the Generals: How Military Advice Affects Public Support for the Use of Force.
          • Center for New American Security,
          • April, 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver, James Golby and Kyle Dropp.
          • Military Campaigns: Veterans' Endorsements and Presidential Elections.
          • Center for New American Security,
          • October, 2012.
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • American Grand Strategy At the Crossroads: Leading From the Front, Leading From Behind, or Not Leading at All,”.
          • Center for New American Security,
          • May, 2012.
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • Nuclear Command and Control in Crisis: Old Lessons From New History.
          • Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College,
          • forthcoming 2013.
          • P.D. Feaver and Eric Lorber.
          • Coercive Diplomacy: Evaluating the Consequences of Financial Sanctions.
          • November 2010.
      • Edited Volumes

          • P.D. Feaver, eds.
          • Strategic Retrenchment and Renewal in the American Experience.
          • Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College,
          • 2014 forthcoming.
      • Journal Articles

          • P.D. Feaver.
          • ""Epilogue: Coordinating Actors in Complex Operations and a Third Way to Study Two Familiar Dualities"."
          • Small Wars and Insurgencies
          • 24
          • .2
          • (2013)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • ""Correspondence: Civilians, Soldiers and the Iraq Surge Decision"."
          • International Security
          • 36
          • .3
          • (Winter 2011/12)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver, Grieco, Gelpi, and Reifler.
          • ""Let's Get a Second Opinion: International Institutions and American Public Support for War"."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 55
          • .2
          • (June, 2011)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • ""The Right to Be Right: CIvil-Military Relations and the Iraq Surge Decision"."
          • International Security
          • 35
          • .4
          • (Spring, 2011)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "In Memoriam: Samuel P. Huntington."
          • Armed Forces and Society
          • 35
          • .4
          • (July, 2009)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Competition and Compromise."
          • Duke Alumni Magazine
          • (May, 2009)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • "Debating American Grand Strategy After Major War."
          • Orbis
          • 53
          • .4
          • (2009)
          • .
      • Book Reviews

          • P.D. Feaver.
          • Review of Richard Betts' American Force.
          • H-Diplo/ISSF
          • (November 5, 2012)
          • .
          • P.D. Feaver.
          • Bruce Fleming’s Bridging the Military-Civilian Divide: What Each Side Must Know about the Other—and about Itself.
          • Proceedings of the US Naval Institute
          • (April, 2011)
          • .
      • Books

          • P.D. Feaver, Sue Wasiolek, Anne Crossman.
          • Getting the Best Out of College (revised 2nd edition).
          • Ten Speed Press,
          • 2012.
          • P.D. Feaver, C. Gelpi, J. Reifler.
          • Paying the Human Costs of War.
          • Princeton,
          • 2009.
    • Gelpi, Christopher

      • Journal Articles

          • C. Gelpi.
          • "Performing On Cue? The Formation of Public Attitudes Toward War."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 54
          • .1
          • (February, 2010)
          • .
          • J. Grieco, C. Gelpi, J Reifler, P Feaver.
          • "Let’s Get a Second Opinion: International Institutions and American Public Support for War."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • (June, 2011)
          • .
          • J. Grieco, C. Gelpi, C. Warren.
          • "When Preferences and Commitments Collide: The Effect of Relative Partisan Shifts on International Treaty Compliance."
          • International Organization
          • (Spring, 2009)
          • .
          • C. Gelpi, P. Feaver, J. Reifler.
          • "Success Matters: Casualty Sensitivity and the War in Iraq."
          • International Security
          • (2005)
          • .
      • Papers Submitted

          • C. Gelpi and N. Avdan.
          • "Clashing States and Civilizations: The Multilateral Flow of Transnational Terrorism, 2000-2007."
          • 2010.
          • C. Gelpi.
          • "Preaching to the Choir? Cable News and the Polarization of American Foreign Policy Views."
          • 2010.
          • C. Gelpi.
          • "News from the Frontlines: The Causal Impact of War News on Presidential Vote Choice."
          • 2010.
          • C. Gelpi.
          • "The Two-Front Homefront: Public Attitudes Toward Afghanistan in the Shadow of Iraq."
          • 2010.
          • C. Gelpi.
          • "It's Not Just the Economy... Iraq, Afghanistan and Vote Choice in 2008.."
          • 2009.
          • C. Gelpi.
          • "Spin Versus Reality: The Formation of American Attitudes Toward War."
          • 2009.
          • J. Grieco, C. Gelpi, P. Feaver, J Reifler.
          • "Let's Get a Second Opinion: International Institutions and American Support for War."
          • 2009.
      • Books

          • C. Gelpi, P. Feaver, J. Reifler.
          • Paying the Human Costs of War: American Public Opinion and Casualties in Military Conflicts.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2009.
    • Gillespie, Michael A.

      • Papers Accepted

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Machiavelli's Modernity and the Christian Tradition."
          • The Modern Turn.
          • Catholic University Press,
          • 2014.
    • Gillespie, Michael

      • Papers Accepted

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "The Anti-Trinitarian Origins of Liberalism."
          • Boston University Series on Religion and Politics.
          • 2014.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "In the Shadow of Modernity."
          • Orientale Lumen IV
          • Melbourne, Australia:
          • 2014.
      • Papers Published

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "“Too Many Wins for North Carolina to Reject Medicaid Expansion,”."
          • Raleigh News and Observer, February 19, 2013.
          • (2013)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "“Jean Elshtain: In Memorium,”."
          • Review of Politics
          • (2013)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie and Lucas Perkins.
          • "The Dangerous Divide : Between Weak Thought and Practical Politics,"."
          • On Vattimo and Zabala's Hermeneutic Communism On Vattimo and Zabala’s Hermeneutic Communism.
          • Ed. Silvia Mazzini.
          • Continuum Press,
          • 2013.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Doing Nothing or Nothing Doing."
          • Nihilism and Contemporary Politics.
          • Jerusalem:
          • Van Leer Institute,
          • 2013.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Radical Philosophy and Political Theology."
          • Religion and Modern European Thought,.
          • Ed. Graham Ward, George Pattison and Nicholas Adams.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2013.
      • Books

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • The Theological Origins of Modernity, Turkish edition.
          • 2013.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • The Theological Origins of Modernity, Chinese edition with a new Preface.
          • Human Science adn Technology Press,
          • 2012.
      • Journal Articles

          • M.A. Gillespie and John Harpham.
          • "Sherlock Holmes, Crime and the Anxieties of Globalization."
          • Critical Review
          • (January, 2012)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • ""March Madness"."
          • The Point
          • (2011)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Response to my Critics."
          • Review of Politics
          • (Fall, 2010)
          • .
          • (As part of a colloquium on my The Theological Origins of Modernity)
          • M.A. Gillespie and Luc Perkins.
          • "Political Anti-Theology: Mark Lilla’s The Stillborn God."
          • Critical Review
          • (Spring, 2010)
          • .
      • Other

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "The History of Democracy."
          • Nov. 6, 2012.
          • ("The State of Things," WUNC Interview)
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Michael Gillespie: Life and Thought."
          • Dec. 3, 2012.
          • (Interview on "The State of Things," WUNC Radio)
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Budget Pain Must Fall on All."
          • Raleigh News and Observer, op ed
          • (July 30, 2011)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Just One of Those We Lost."
          • Raleigh News and Observer, oped
          • (Sept. 11, 2011)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Interview."
          • Tehran Times
          • (2010)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Science and the Humanities."
          • 2010.
          • (On the Human, A Project of the National Humanities Center)
          • [web]
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Response to Robert Pippin."
          • 2010.
          • (On the Human, A Project of the National Humanities Center)
          • [web]
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "“Backgammon Anyone?” A response to Alexander Rosenberg’s “The Disenchanted Naturalist’s Guide to Reality”."
          • 2009.
          • (On the Human, A Project of the National Humanities Center)
          • [web]
      • Chapters in Books

          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "On Debt."
          • 21st Century Studies
          • .
          • University of Inidana Press,
          • (2012)
          • .
          • M.A. Gillespie and Keegan Calanan.
          • "Toward Noon: Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals."
          • A Companion to Friedrich Nietzsche.
          • Ed. Paul Bishop.
          • Melton England:
          • Camden House,
          • 2012.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Radical Hopes: Apocalyptic Longings in Nineteenth Century Philosophy."
          • The Apocalyptic Complex – Origins, Histories, Permanence.
          • Ed. Nadia Al-Bagdadi, Matthias Riedl, David Marno.
          • CEU Press,
          • 2012.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Martin Heidegger."
          • The Cambridge Dictionary of Political Thought.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2012.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Dostoevsky and Nietzsche: Murder, Madness, and Suicide. Nihilism and the Doctrine of the Eternal Recurrence."
          • Nietzsche and Dostoevsky.
          • Ed. Jeffrey Metzger.
          • Continuum Press,
          • 2012.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Nihilism."
          • , Edinburgh Critical History of Philosophy.
          • : Edinburgh University Press,
          • 2011.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "The Tragedy of the Goods and the Pursuit of Happiness."
          • The Idea of the Good.
          • Ed. Ruth Grant.
          • Chicago, IL:
          • University of Chicago Press,
          • 2011.
          • M.A. Gillespie.
          • "Hegel."
          • The International Encyclopedia of Political Science,.
          • Ed. George Kurian et al.
          • 2009.
    • Goss, Kristin A.

      • Op-eds

          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Turn Emotion Into Action."
          • New York Times
          • (April 18, 2014)
          • .
          • [web]
    • Goss, Kristin

      • Op-eds

          • P.J. Cook and K.A. Goss.
          • "In School Rampages, the Weapon Matters."
          • CNN.com
          • (April 11, 2014)
          • .
          • [web]
          • K.A. Goss (interview).
          • "Up in Arms: The Political Science Behind Gun Control."
          • Georgetown Public Policy Review
          • (March 25, 2013)
          • .
          • [web]
          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Another View: How Military Leaders Can Change the Conversation on Guns."
          • Des Moines Register; News & Observer (Raleigh),
          • January, 2013.
          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Why We Need to Talk About Guns."
          • Newsweek
          • (January, 2013)
          • .
          • K.A. Goss.
          • "NRA’s Vision of ‘Genuine Monsters."
          • CNN.com
          • (December, 2012)
          • .
          • K.A. Goss & D. Dees.
          • "Rallying for Gun Reform."
          • Tampa Bay Times; News & Observer (Raleigh)
          • (December, 2012)
          • .
          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Taking Aim at the Gun Debate."
          • Newark Star-Ledger; Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Raleigh News & Observer;
          • (June 14, 16, 18, 2010)
          • .
          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Is Tenure a Matter of Life or Death?."
          • Chronicle Review (Chronicle of Higher Education)
          • (February 21, 2010)
          • .
      • Books

          • P.J. Cook and K.A. Goss.
          • The Gun Debate: What Everyone Needs to Know.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • April, 2014.
          • [web]
          • K.A. Goss.
          • The Paradox of Gender Equality: How American Women's Groups Gained and Lost Their Public Voice.
          • University of Michigan Press,
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This book examines the role of US women’s organizations in public policy advocacy from the late 19th century through the dawn of the 21st century. It shows that, after winning the vote, women’s groups exploded on the national stage; but after the feminist victories of the 1960s and 1970s, women’s groups’ presence declined dramatically. The book emphasizes the importance of mass membership groups with broad issue agendas for representing women’s interests in national policy debates, as well as women’s relevance in advancing the interests of disadvantaged groups and the general public.

      • Book Reviews

          • K.A. Goss.
          • Review of The U.S. Women’s Jury Movements and Strategic Adaptation.
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • (forthcoming, 2014)
          • .
          • K.A. Goss.
          • Review of Gendered Money: Financial Organization in Women’s Movements, 1880-1933,.
          • Journal of Women, Politics & Policy
          • 34
          • .3
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 290-91.
      • Journal Articles

          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Does the United States Still Need a Women’s Movement?."
          • Politics & Gender
          • 10
          • (2014)
          • .
        • Publication Description

          The Million Mom March (favoring gun control) and Code Pink: Women for Peace (focusing on foreign policy, especially the War in Iraq) are organizations that have mobilized women as women in an era when other women’s groups struggled to maintain critical mass and turned away from non-gender-specific public issues. This article addresses how these organizations fostered collective consciousness among women, a large and diverse group, while confronting the echoes of backlash against previous mobilization efforts by women. We argue that the March and Code Pink achieved mobilization success by creating hybrid organizations that blended elements of three major collective action frames: maternalism, egalitarianism, and feminine expression. These innovative organizations invented hybrid forms that cut across movements, constituencies, and political institutions. Using surveys, interviews, and content analysis of organizational documents, this article explains how the March and Code Pink met the contemporary challenges facing women’s collective action in similar yet distinct ways. It highlights the role of feminine expression and concerns about the intersectional marginalization of women in resolving the historic tensions between maternalism and egalitarianism. It demonstrates hybridity as a useful analytical lens to understand gendered organizing and other forms of grassroots collective action.

          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Civil Society and Civic Engagement: Towards a Multi-Level Theory of Policy Feedbacks."
          • Journal of Civil Society
          • 6
          • .2
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 119-143.
          • K.A. Goss, D. Gastwirth, S. Parkash.
          • "Research Service Learning: Making the Academy Relevant Again."
          • Journal of Political Science Education
          • 6
          • .2
          • (2010)
          • .
          • [Pre-Publication Manuscript]
          Publication Description

          For at least 20 years, American universities, political scientists, and college students each have been criticized for holding themselves aloof from public life. This article introduces a pedagogical method – research service-learning (RSL) – and examines whether it can provide a means of integrating scholarly theory with civic practice to enhance student outcomes. In particular, we examine whether a modest dose of RSL in the form of an optional course add-on (the “RSL gateway option”) is associated with higher scores on 12 educational and civic measures. We find that the RSL gateway option did not have effects on some important outcomes – such as intellectual engagement, problem solving, and knowledge retention – but it did appear to open students’ eyes to future opportunities in academic research and nonprofit and public sector work. The RSL add-on also appears to have helped students make the intellectual link between scholarly theory and the challenges facing volunteers and voluntary organizations. We argue that RSL, in its gateway-option formulation, is an administratively feasible pedagogy that can simultaneously help to resolve the relevancy dilemmas facing research universities, political scientists, and students seeking connections between the classroom and public policy.

          This paper grew out of our experience using research service learning as a voluntary component of PPS 114. It is coauthored with two recent Duke grads who worked for the Hart Leadership Program.

          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Never Surrender? How Women’s Groups Abandoned Their Policy Niche in U.S. Foreign Policy Debates, 1916–2000."
          • Politics & Gender
          • 5
          • .4
          • (December, 2009)
          • :
          • 453-489.
          Publication Description

          From World War I through the 1960s, U.S. women’s organizations regularly trekked to Capitol Hill to influence Congressional foreign policy debates. Yet by the 1990s, these groups had largely disengaged from international affairs. Why? Using an original dataset of women’s group appearances before Congress from 1916-2000, this study documents and explains this puzzling development by exploring the mutually reinforcing linkages among women’s identity, claims to issue ownership, and interest group evolution. In the case at hand, the advent of citizen and economic groups competing with women’s organizations for ownership of foreign policy questions, coupled with the declining legitimacy of gender “difference” arguments and the resurgence of “sameness” arguments, led women’s groups to focus on the dimensions of foreign policy particularly affecting women’s rights and status and to abandon less explicitly gendered foreign policy issues entirely. As multipurpose women’s associations declined in vitality, and feminist groups fueled by newly available philanthropic dollars staked claim to women’s rights-and-status questions, organized womanhood surrendered much of the foreign-policy issue space over which women had long claimed political authority, and women’s groups’ presence on Capitol Hill waned.

      • Chapters in Books

          • K.A. Goss.
          • "Gender Identity and the Shifting Basis of U.S. Women’s Groups’ Advocacy, 1920-2000."
          • Nonprofit Advocacy.
          • Bokutakusha (Tokyo); Johns Hopkins (USA),
          • Forthcoming 2012/13.
          • K.A. Goss and S.L. Shames.
          • "Political Pathways to Child Care Policy: The Role of Gender in Statebuilding."
          • Women and Politics around the World: Comparative History and Survey.
          • ABC-CLIO,
          • 2009.
    • Grant, Ruth W.

      • Papers Published

          • R.W. Grant.
          • "John Locke on Custom's Power and Reason's Authority."
          • Review of Politics
          • (Fall, 2012)
          • .
    • Grant, Ruth

      • Books

          • R.W. Grant.
          • Strings Attached: Untangling t he Ethics of Incentives.
          • Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation,
          • 2012.
          • In Search of Goodness.
          • University of Chicago Press,
          • 2011.
    • Grieco, Joseph M

      • Chapters in Books

          • J.M. Grieco.
          • "Nuclear Weapons, State Bellicosity, and Prospects for a Northeast Asian Security Architecture."
          • Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Architecture and Beyond.
          • Ed. T.J. Pempel and Chung-Min Lee.
          • Routledge,
          • 2011.
    • Grieco, Joseph

      • Papers Published

          • with
          • Christopher Gelpi, Jason Reifler, and Peter Feaver.
          • "“Let’s Get a Second Opinion: International Institutions and American Public Support for War”."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 55
          • .2
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 563-83.
          • J.M. Grieco.
          • ""“Liberal International Theory and Imagining the End of the Cold War"."
          • British Journal of International Relations
          • 11
          • .2
          • (May, 2009)
          • :
          • 192-204.
          • with
          • Christopher Gelpi and T. Camber Warren.
          • "“When Preferences and Commitments Collide: The Effect of Relative Partisan Shifts on International Treaty Compliance"."
          • International Organization
          • 63
          • (Spring, 2009)
          • :
          • 341-355.
    • Hacohen, Malachi H.

      • Books

          • Malachi Haim Hacohen.
          • Jacob and Esau Between Nation and Empire: A Jewish European History.
          • 2014.
    • Hacohen, Malachi

      • Journal Articles

          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "Typology and the Holocaust: Erich Auerbach and Judeo-Christian Europe."
          • Religions
          • 3
          • (July, 2012)
          • :
          • 600-645.
          • [web]
          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "Berlin and Popper Between Nation and Empire: Diaspora, Cosmopolitanism, and Jewish Life."
          • Jewish Historical Studies
          • 44
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 51-74.
          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "’The Strange Fact That the State of Israel Exists’: The Cold War Liberals Between Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism."
          • Jewish Social Studies
          • 15
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 37-81.
          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "The Culture of Viennese Science and the Riddle of Austrian Liberalism."
          • Modern Intellectual History
          • 6
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 369-396.
      • Edited Volumes

          • M.H. Hacohen, eds.
          • Between Religion and Ethnicity: Twentieth-Century Jewish Émigrés and the Shaping of Postwar Culture.
          • Religions
          • ,
          • Ed. Malachi Hacohen & Julie Mell.
          • (2012)
          • .
          • [web]
      • Book Chapters

          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "Congress for Cultural Freedom."
          • Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture.
          • Ed. Dan Diner.
          • 2
          • J. B. Metzler'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung,,
          • 2012.
          • 22-28.
          Publication Description

          in German

          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "From Forvm to Neues Forvm: The ‘Congress for Cultural Freedom,’ the 68ers and the Émigrés."
          • Das Jahr 1968 – Ereignis, Symbol, Chiffre.
          • Ed. Oliver Rathkolb and Friedrich Stadler.
          • Vienna University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 239-274.
      • Papers In Progress

          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • "Envisioning Central Europe: Friedrich Torberg, the Austrian Émigrés and Jewish European History."
          • Journal of Modern Jewish History
          • (2012)
          • .
      • Book Reviews

          • M.H. Hacohen.
          • Eugene R. Sheppard, Leo Strauss and the Politics of Exile: The Making of a Political Philosopher.
          • Studies in Contemporary Jewry
          • 24
          • (2009)
          • .
    • Hamilton, James T.

      • Journal Articles

          • Brian G. Southwell, J.T. Hamilton, and Jonathan S. Slater.
          • ""Why Addressing the Poor and Underserved is Vexing"."
          • Health Communication
          • 26
          • .6
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 583-585.
    • Hamilton, James

      • Chapters in Books

          • J.T. Hamilton.
          • ""Measuring Spillovers in Markets for Local Public Affairs Coverage"."
          • The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication.
          • Ed. Kate Kenski and Kathleen Hall Jamieson.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • Forthcoming 2012.
          • J.T. Hamilton.
          • ""What's the Incentive to Save Journalism?"."
          • Will the Last Reporter Please Turn Out the Lights: The Collapse of Journalism and What Can be Done to Fix It.
          • Ed. Robert W. McChesney and Victor Pickard.
          • New Press,
          • 2011.
          • 277-288.
      • Journal Articles

          • Sarah Cohen, J. T. Hamilton, and Fred Turner.
          • ""Computational Journalism: How Computer Scientists Can Empower Journalists, Democracy's Watchdogs, in the Production of News in the Public Interest"."
          • Communications of the ACM
          • 54
          • .10
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 66-71.
          • J.T. Hamilton.
          • "The (Many) Missing Markets for International News: How News From Abroad Sells at Home"."
          • Journalism Studies
          • 11
          • .5
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 650-666.
      • Books

          • J.T. Hamilton.
          • Conserving Data in the Conservation Reserve Program: How a Regulatory Program Runs on Imperfect Information.
          • Washington, DC: Resources for the Future Press,
          • 2010.
          • Scott de Marchi and J.T. Hamilton.
          • You Are What You Choose: The Habits of Mind that Really Determine How We Make Decisions.
          • New York: Portfolio (Penguin Group),
          • 2009.
    • Haynie, Kerry L

      • Journal Articles

          • K. Haynie and Lisa Garcia Bedolla.
          • "The Obama Coalition and the Future of AMerican Politics."
          • Politics, Groups, and Identities
          • 1
          • .1
          • (2013)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • K. Haynie and Beth Reingold.
          • "Representing Women's Interests and Intersections of Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in U.S. State Legislatures."
          • Representation: The Case of Women, Maria Escobar-Lemmon and Michelle M. Taylor.
          • New York: Oxford University Press,
          • forthcoming.
          • with
          • Candis S. Watts.
          • "“Blacks and the Democratic Party: A Resilient Coalition,”."
          • New Directions in American Political Parties.
          • Ed. Jeffrey Stonecash.
          • Routledge, Taylor Francis,
          • 2010.
          • K. Haynie.
          • "Understanding Visible Minorities in Politics: Beyond the Single Axes."
          • 'Minorités visibles en politique'.
          • CNRS éditions,
          • forthcoming.
          • K. Haynie and Candis S. Watts.
          • "“Blacks and the Democratic Party: A Resilient Coalition,”."
          • New Directions in American Political Parties.
          • Ed. Jeffrey Stonecash.
          • Routledge, Taylor Francis,
          • forthcoming 2010.
    • Hillygus, D. Sunshine

      • Chapters in Books

          • Frankel, Laura and D.S. Hillygus.
          • "Niche Communication in Political Campaigns."
          • Oxford Handbook on Political Communication.
          • Ed. Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Kate Kenski.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2014.
    • Hillygus, D.

      • Chapters in Books

          • Hillygus, D.S., N. Jackson, and M. Young.
          • "“Professional Respondents in Online Survey Panels,” Online Panel Research - A Data Quality Perspective.."
          • Online Panel Research - A Data Quality Perspective.
          • Ed. M.Callegaro, R. Baker, P. Lavrakas, J. Krosnick, J. Bethlehem, and A. Gritz.
          • Wiley,
          • 2014.
          • D.S. Hillygus and B. Burden.
          • "Mass Polarization in the Bush Presidency."
          • The Presidency of George W. Bush: Perspectives on the Forty-Third President of the United States.
          • Ed. D. Kelly and T. Shields.
          • Texas A&M Press,
          • 2013.
          • D.S. Hillygus.
          • "The Practice of Survey Research: Changes and Challenges'."
          • New Directions in Public Opinion Resesarch.
          • 2011.
          • Bishop and Hillygus.
          • "Campaigning, Debating, Advertising."
          • Oxford Handbook on Media and Public Opinion.
          • 2011.
          • D.S. Hillygus.
          • "The Need for Survey Reporting Standards in Political Science."
          • The Future of Political Science: 100 Perspectives.
          • 2009.
          • D.S. Hillygus.
          • "Campaign Effects on Vote Choice."
          • Oxford Handbook on Political Behavior.
          • 2009.
      • Journal Articles

          • Aldrich, J., B. Bishop, R. Hatch, D.S. Hillygus, and D. Rohde.
          • "Blame, Responsibility, and the Tea Party in the 2010 Midterm Elections."
          • Political Behavior
          • (2013)
          • .
          • Deng, Y., D.S. Hillygus, J. Reiter, and Y. Si..
          • "Handling Attrition in Longitudinal Studies: The Case for Refreshment Samples."
          • Statistical Science
          • 28
          • .2
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 238-256.
          • Frankel, Laura and D. Sunshine Hillygus.
          • "Panel Attrition and the Survey Experience."
          • Political Analysis
          • (2013)
          • .
          • Henderson, Mike and D.S. Hillygus.
          • "The Dynamics of Health Care Opinion, 2008-2010,."
          • Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law
          • (2011)
          • .
          • D.S. Hillygus.
          • "``The Evolution of Election Polling in the United States,''."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • (2011)
          • .
          • Henderson and Hillygus.
          • "‘Sour Grapes’ or Rational Voting? Voter Decision Making Among Thwarted Primary Voters in 2008."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • (2010)
          • .
          • Henderson and Hillygus.
          • "“Issues in the 2008 Presidential Election"."
          • Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties
          • (2010)
          • .
          • Ellis, Hillygus, and Nie.
          • "Retrospective or Prospective Voting in 2008."
          • Electoral Studies
          • (2010)
          • .
          • Treier and Hillygus.
          • "The Nature of Political Ideology in the Contemporary Electorate."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • (2009)
          • .
          • Burden and Hillygus.
          • "Opinion Formation, Polarization, and Presidential Reelection."
          • Presidential Studies Quarterly
          • (2009)
          • .
    • Holsti, Ole R

      • Books

          • O.R. Holsti.
          • American Public Opinion on the Iraq War.
          • 2011.
    • Holsti, Ole

      • Books

          • O.R. Holsti.
          • Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy, rev. ed..
          • 2009.
          • O.R. Holsti.
          • To See Ourselves as Others See Us: How Publics Abroad View the U.S. Since September 11.
          • 2009.
    • Horowitz, Donald L

      • Journal Articles

          • D.L. Horowitz.
          • "Getting to No: Obstacles on the Road to Middle East Peace."
          • The American Interest, September – October 2010.
          • (2010)
          • .
    • Horowitz, Donald

      • Journal Articles

          • D.L. Horowitz.
          • "Will Kymlicka's Multicultural Odysseys: Prudential and Moral Issues."
          • Nationalities Papers, Vol. 38, no. 1 (January 2010).
          • (2010)
          • .
          • D.L. Horowitz.
          • "The Federalist Abroad in the World."
          • in a new edition of The Federalist, edited by Ian Shapiro (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), pp 502-532.
          • (2009)
          • .
          • D.L. Horowitz.
          • "A Federal Constituency for Belgium: Right Idea, Inadequate Method."
          • in Kris Deschouwer and Philippe Van Parijs, eds., Electoral Engineering for a Stalled Federation (Brussels: Re-Bel e-book, 2009)
          • (2009)
          • .
    • Jentleson, Bruce W.

      • Books

          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century.
          • New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 5th edition forthcoming,
          • 2013.
    • Jentleson, Bruce

      • Journal Articles

          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Accepting Limits: How to Adapt to a Copernican World."
          • Democracy: A Journal of Ideas
          • (Winter, 2012)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Global Governance in a Copernican World."
          • Global Governance
          • 17
          • (Summer 2012)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "The Obama Administration and R2P: Progress, Problems and Prospects."
          • Global Responsibility to Protect
          • Winter 2012-13
          • (2012)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "The Remaking of the Middle East."
          • Duke Magazine
          • (Summer, 2011)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Beware the Duck Test."
          • Washington Quarterly
          • (Summer, 2011)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Metternich of Arabia."
          • National Interest Online
          • (June 29, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
          • B.W. Jentleson and Ely Ratner.
          • "Bridging the Beltway-Ivory Tower Gap."
          • International Studies Review
          • (March, 2011)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Normative Future: A U.S. Perspective."
          • Transatlantic 2020: A Tale of Four Futures.
          • Ed. Daniel Hamilton and Kurt Volker.
          • SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations (Brookings Institution Press),
          • 2011.
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "The Atlantic Alliance in a Post-America World."
          • Journal of Trans-Atlantic Studies
          • (March, 2009)
          • .
      • Book Reviews

          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • Theories of International Relations and Zombies, Daniel Drezner.
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • March 2012
          • (2012)
          • .
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • How We Fight: Crusades, Quagmires and the American Way of War, Dominic Tierney.
          • H-DIPLO/ISSF,
          • Vol. III, No. 9 (March 2012)
          • (2012)
          • .
      • Monographs

          • B.W. Jentleson, A. Exum et al.
          • Strategic Adaptation: Towards a New U.S. Strategy in the Middle East.
          • Center for a New American Security (CNAS),
          • 2012.
      • Other

          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "The Bi-Sectoralists."
          • 2011-.
          • (Monthly column in Huffington Post, co-authored with Jay Pelosky.)
      • Chapters in Books

          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Effective Multilateralism: US Perspectives."
          • Effective Multilateralism: Through the Looking Glass of East Asia.
          • Ed. Jochen Prantl,.
          • Palgrave MacMillan,
          • forthcoming.
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Coercive Diplomacy: Scope and Limits, Theory and Policy."
          • The Routledge Companion to Security Studies.
          • Ed. Victor Mauer and Myriam Dunn Cavelty.
          • 2009.
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • "Policy Planning: An Integrative Executive Branch Strategy."
          • Avoiding Trivia: The Role of Strategic Planning in American Foreign Policy.
          • Ed. Daniel W. Drezner.
          • Brookings Institution Press,
          • 2009.
      • Books

          • B.W. Jentleson and Steven Weber.
          • The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas.
          • Harvard University Press,
          • 2010.
          • B.W. Jentleson.
          • American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century.
          • W.W. Norton,
          • 2010.
    • Johnson, Tana L

      • Books

          • Tana Johnson.
          • Organizational Progeny: Why Governments are Losing Control over the Proliferating Structures of Global Governance.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2014.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In life, delegation is fundamental. But it is difficult, especially when attempted internationally, as in the long delegation chains to the United Nations family and other global governance structures. There, much hinges on the design of delegation relationships. What prompts another entity to fall in line - and if it does not, what can be done? For international organizations, the conventional answer is simple: when designing institutions, member-states endow themselves with stringent control mechanisms, such as monopolization of financing or vetoes over decision-making in the new body. But as Tana Johnson shows, the conventional answer is outdated. States rarely design international organizations alone. Instead, negotiations usually involve international bureaucrats employed in pre-existing organizations. To unveil these overlooked but pivotal players, Organizational Progeny uses new data on nearly 200 intergovernmental organizations and detailed accounts of the origins of prominent and diverse institutions - the World Food Program, United Nations Development Program, International Energy Agency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Financial Action Task Force, Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS. When international bureaucrats have a say, they often strive to insulate new institutions against the usual control mechanisms by which states steer, monitor, or reverse organizational activities. This increases control costs for states, is difficult to roll back, and even produces bodies that powerful countries initially opposed. The result is a proliferation of organizational progeny over which national governments are literally losing "control". Johnson explores what this means for the democratic nature of global governance and how practitioners can encourage or staunch this phenomenon.

    • Johnson, Tana

      • Journal Articles

        • Publication Description

          Bureaucrats working in international intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) regularly help states design new IGOs. Sometimes international bureaucrats possess limited discretion in institutional design; sometimes, they enjoy broad discretion. In fact, they gain discretion even when they openly oppose state preferences. This contravenes conventional thinking about delegation: discretion should decrease as preference divergence between states and international bureaucrats increases. We develop a principal-agent theory of how much discretion states grant to international bureaucrats in the design of new IGOs. This is novel: while principal-agent theories of international delegation are common, scholars have not analyzed principal-agent relationships in the creation of new IGOs. We argue that even an international bureaucracy that disagrees with states’ design preferences may enjoy substantial design leeway, because of states’ need for bureaucratic expertise. In developing this argument, we employ a formal principal-agent model, case studies, and an original data set.

        • Publication Description

          Why do governmental institutions look as they do, and who controls them? International relations scholars often point to states. However, two-thirds of today’s international intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) were created not by states alone, but with participation by international bureaucrats working in pre-existing IGOs. International bureaucrats’ design activities range from modest to very proactive. Meanwhile, their interests differ from states’ interests: insulating their organizational family from state intervention facilitates international bureaucrats’ pursuit of material security, legitimacy, and policy advancement. The more proactive the design activities of international bureaucrats, I argue, the more insulated the resulting institution will be from mechanisms of state control (e.g., financial monopolization or veto power). Statistical analyses of an original dataset support the prediction and are robust to alternative specifications as well as approaches to control for endogeneity. The implications – concerning institutional design, principal-agent relationships, bureaucratic autonomy, and democratic deficits – go far beyond international relations.

          • Tana Johnson.
          • "Looking beyond States: Openings for International Bureaucrats to Enter the Institutional Design Process."
          • Review of International Organizations
          • 8
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 499-519.
          Publication Description

          Surprisingly little research investigates a stark reality: the vast majority of today’s international intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) were crafted not by states alone, but with participation by international bureaucrats working in pre-existing IGOs. What explains this phenomenon? Drawing on international relations scholarship, this article develops predictions involving the capabilities of states, or a matter’s salience to states. The predictions are tested with a new and original dataset that captures, for the first time, variation in the roles that international bureaucrats play in the institutional design arena. Statistical analyses find that states’ need for expertise, as well as the design negotiations’ distance from high-politics, leave openings for international bureaucrats to enter institutional design processes. The findings enhance our understanding of institutional design, principal-agent relationships, non-state actors, and divisions of labor in contemporary global governance.

          • Tana Johnson and Johannes Urpelainen.
          • "A Strategic Theory of Regime Integration and Separation."
          • International Organization
          • 66
          • .4
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 645-677.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          States frequently disagree on the importance of cooperation in different issue areas. Under these conditions, when do states prefer to integrate regimes instead of keeping them separated? We develop a strategic theory of regime integration and separation. The theory highlights the nature of spillovers between issues. Positive spillovers exist when cooperation in one issue area aids the pursuit of objectives in another issue area; negative spillovers exist when cooperation in one issue area impedes this pursuit in another issue area. Conventional wisdom suggests that both positive and negative spillovers foster greater integration. We argue that negative spillovers encourage integration while positive spillovers do not. States integrate not to exploit positive spillovers between issues but to mitigate negative spillovers. To test our theory, we examine the degree of integration or separation among environmental regimes.

          • Tana Johnson.
          • "Guilt by Association: The Link between States' Influence and the Legitimacy of Intergovernmental Organizations."
          • Review of International Organizations
          • 6
          • .1
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 57-84.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Unfavorable views toward a particular state will result in skepticism about the legitimacy of international intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) in which that state possesses influence. The more extensive the avenues of influence, the stronger this “guilt by association.” The rationale is two-fold. First, a state that possesses institutionalized influence (e.g., a veto) within an intergovernmental organization faces substantial difficulties in credibly committing to non-interference with organizational activities. Second, even if a state somehow could commit to abstention from overt interference, it may exert covert ideational influence if it already has embedded its values into an IGO. Elites and laypeople alike recognize the avenues of influence that fuel guilt-by-association. With statistical analyses of public opinion data from 35,397 people in 23 countries, I provide the first systematic evidence that guilt-by-association exists: for the United States, Russia, Japan, and Pakistan, vis-à-vis the United Nations, World Bank, and International Monetary Fund. The evidence is robust to numerous alternative specifications. The findings contribute to international relations scholarship by enhancing our understanding of threats to IGO legitimacy and by providing concrete evidence for a mechanism by which antipathy toward powerful states matters in the international realm.

      • Chapters in Books

          • Tana Johnson with William Howell.
          • "War's Contributions to Presidential Power."
          • Oxford Handbook of the American Presidency.
          • New York, NY:
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
    • Johnston, Christopher

      • Papers Accepted

          • Federico, C.M., Johnston, C.D., & Lavine, H.
          • "Context, Engagement, and the (Multiple) Functions of Negativity Bias."
          • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • (N.d.)
          • .
          • Johnston, C.D., Wronski, J.
          • "Personality Dispositions and Political Preferences across Hard and Easy Issues."
          • Political Psychology
          • (N.d.)
          • .
          • Feldman, S., & Johnston, C.D.
          • "Understanding the Determinants of Political Ideology: Implications of Structural Complexity."
          • Political Psychology
          • (N.d.)
          • .
      • Journal Articles

          • Bartels, B.L., & Johnston, C.D.
          • "On the Ideological Foundations of Supreme Court Legitimacy in the Mass Public."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • 57
          • .1
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 184-199.
          • Johnston, C.D.
          • "Dispositional Sources of Economic Protectionism."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • 77
          • .2
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 574-585.
          • Newman, B.J., Johnston, C.D., Strickland, A., & Citrin, J.
          • "Immigration Crackdown in the American Workplace: Explaining Variation in E-Verify Adoption across the U.S. States."
          • State Politics and Policy Quarterly
          • 12
          • .2
          • (June, 2012)
          • :
          • 160-182.
          • [web]
          • Bartels, B.L., & Johnston, C.D.
          • "Political Justice? Perceptions of Politicization and Public Preferences toward the Supreme Court Appointment Process."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • 76
          • .1
          • (Spring, 2012)
          • :
          • 105-116.
          • [web]
          • Johnston, C.D., & Bartels, B.L.
          • "Sensationalism and Sobriety: Differential Media Exposure and Attitudes American Courts."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • 74
          • .2
          • (Summer, 2010)
          • :
          • 260-285.
          Publication Description

          While a great deal of research has focused on understanding the foundations of public support for American courts, scant attention has been paid to the role of the media for such attitudes. Given the media’s demonstrated ability to influence public opinion, this remains a substantial gap in the literature. In the present paper we examine how different types of media—sensationalist (i.e., political radio and cable news) or sober (i.e., newspapers and network news) — influence individuals’ attitudes toward both the U.S. Supreme Court and courts at the state level. In line with our predictions, we find that sensationalist media exposure depresses both diffuse and specific support for American courts. Additionally, our results call into question the unconditional nature of the ubiquitous sophistication-approval relationship. We find that sophistication’s positive effect on court attitudes is conditional on an individual’s particular source of political information.

      • Books

          • Lavine, H.G., Johnston, C.D., & Steenbergen, M.R.
          • The Ambivalent Partisan: How Critical Loyalty Promotes Democracy.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2012.
          • [web]
    • Keech, William R.

      • Book Reviews

          • with
          • Nara Dillon.
          • How China Became Capitalist, by Ronald Coase and Ning Wang.
          • Public Choice
          • 158
          • .1-2
          • Springer,
          • 2014.
          • 289-291.
    • Keech, William

      • Books

          • William.R. Keech.
          • Economic Politics in the United States: The Costs and Risks of Democracy.
          • 2013.
      • Other

          • W.R. Keech and Michael Munger.
          • "Political Economy."
          • International Encyclopedia of Political Science.
          • 2010.
      • Book Reviews

          • W.R. Keech.
          • Good Capitalism, Bad Capitalism and the Economics of Growth and Prosperity, by Baumol et al..
          • EHNet
          • (2009)
          • .
    • Kelley, Judith

      • Journal Articles

          • Judith Kelley and Beth Simmons.
          • "Politics by Number: Indicators as Social Pressure in International Relations."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • (Online first)
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The ability to monitor state behavior has become a critical tool of international governance. Systematic monitoring allows for the creation of numerical indicators that can be used to rank, compare and essentially censure states. This article argues that the ability to disseminate such numerical indicators widely and instantly constitutes an exercise of social power, with the potential to change important policy outputs. It explores this argument in the context of the United States’ efforts to combat trafficking in persons and find evidence that monitoring has important effects: countries are more likely to criminalize human trafficking when they are included in the US annual Trafficking in Persons Report, while countries that are placed on a “watch list” are also more likely to criminalize. These findings have broad implications for international governance and the exercise of soft power in the global information age.

          • J. Kelley.
          • "The international influences on Elections in New Multi-Party States."
          • Annual Review of Political Science
          • 15
          • .June
          • (June, 2012)
          • :
          • 203-220.
          • Judith Kelley and Jon Pevehouse.
          • "An Opportunity Cost Theory of Treaty Ratification."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
          Publication Description

          It is a striking feature of multilateral cooperation that although the United States often leads in the creation of treaties, it sometimes never joins those treaties or does so only after considerable delay. Most international relations theory expects states to join treaties as long as the benefits outweigh the costs. Domestic theories modify this with the constraints of institutional veto players. Yet, sometimes neither of these arguments explains the delay or absence of US participation. This paper supplements these explanations with an opportunity cost theory that argues that the advice and consent process sometimes slows or stalls because it imposes costs in terms of legislative time and political capital that politicians prefer to spend on other priorities. These costs alter the calculus of key players and may obstruct or delay the process, sometimes leading the President and Senators to deprioritize treaties despite their interests in their success. Statistical analysis of the stages of the treaty process supports the argument. The priority the Senate and President give to treaties depends not only on the value they assign to the treaty, but also on the value of other possible policy achievements. Presidents are less, not more likely to transmit treaties to the Senate the more support he has in Congress. Furthermore, the more support the President has in Congress, the more the cost of Senate floor time matters for advice and consent.

          • J. Kelley.
          • "Do International Election Monitors Increase or Decrease Opposition Boycotts?."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • 44
          • .11
          • (November, 2011)
          • :
          • 1527-1556.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Election boycotts are over twice as common when international observers are present. Do international observers increase election boycotts as this correlation and past research suggest? This article argues not. Observers tend to go to elections with many problems and it is primarily these, rather than monitors, that drive boycotts. Furthermore, opposition parties have reasons to hope that observers can improve the quality of the election or that they will increase attention to election fraud, and therefore opposition parties may actually abandon boycott plans. Whether they do, however, depends on their expectations about how the observers will behave. This makes it important to account for the varying reputation of observer organizations. Thus, using matching to address the selection problem, this article shows that international observers can actually deter boycotts, but only if the observers are reputable.

          • with
          • Susan Hyde.
          • "The Limits of Election Monitoring: What Independent Observation Can (and Can’t) Do."
          • Foreign Affairs
          • (June 29, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
          • J. Kelley.
          • "Election Observers and Their Biases."
          • Journal of Democracy
          • 21
          • .July
          • (July, 2010)
          • :
          • 158-172.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Why do election monitors sometimes issue contradictory statements or endorse flawed elections? The answers are not always straightforward; in some cases, the monitors’ good intentions may undermine their credibility.

          • J. Kelley.
          • "D-Minus Elections: The Politics and Norms of International Election Observation."
          • International Organization
          • 63
          • .4
          • (Fall, 2009)
          • :
          • 765 - 787.
          • J. Kelley.
          • "The More the Merrier? The Effects of Having Multiple International Election Monitoring Organizations.2008."
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 7
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 59-64.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          As the pressure to invite international election monitors rose at the end of the Cold War, states refused to grant the United Nations a dominant role. Thus, today multiple intergovernmental, regional and international non-governmental organizations often monitor the same elections with equal authority. This article examines the costs and benefits of this complex regime to highlight some possible broader implications of regime complexity. It argues that the availability of many different organizations facilitates action that might otherwise have been blocked for political reasons. Furthermore, when different international election monitoring agencies agree, their consensus can bolster their individual legitimacy as well as the legitimacy of the international norms they stress, and thus magnify their influence on domestic politics. Unfortunately the election monitoring example also suggests that complex regimes can engender damaging inter-organizational politics and that the different biases, capabilities, and standards of organizations sometime can lead organizations to outright contradict each other or work at cross purposes.

      • Chapters in Books

          • J. Kelley.
          • "The Potential for Organizational Membership Rules to Enhance Regional Cooperation?."
          • Integrating Regions: Asia in Comparative Perspective.
          • Ed. Miles Kahler and Andrew MacIntyre.
          • Palo Alto:
          • Stanford University Press,
          • 2013.
          • 78-103.
      • Other

          • J. Kelley.
          • "Putin 'victory' rests on narrow definition of fraud, Letter to the Editor."
          • Financial Times
          • (March 8, 2012)
          • .
          • J. Kelley.
          • "Commentator."
          • Voice of Russia
          • (October 25, 2012)
          • .
          • (Election observers in the upcoming US election)
          • J. Kelley.
          • "Interviewee."
          • Radio - New Zealand's Sunday Morning program
          • (August, 2012)
          • .
          • (Election monitoring)
          • J. Kelley.
          • "Data on International Election Monitoring: Three Global Datasets on Election Quality, Election Events and International Election Observation.."
          • [Computer file]. ICPSR31461-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor]
          • (December 1, 2011)
          • .
          • (doi:10.3886/ICPSR31461.v1)
          Publication Description

          This data collection focuses on elections and election monitoring throughout the world. Dataset 1, Data on International Election Monitoring (DIEM), codes the assessement and activities of international election monitoring organizations to national-level legislative and presidential elections in 108 countries from 1980-2004. Dataset 2, Quality of Elections Data (QED), codes the quality of national-level legislative and presidential elections in 172 countries from 1978 to 2004. Dataset 3, Supplementary Election Data, includes supplementary information on all direct presidential and legislative elections in 182 countries from 1975-2004.

      • Published Policy Briefs and Comments

          • J. Kelley.
          • Election Monitoring: Power, Limits, Risks. A Markets and Democracy Brief.
          • March, 2012.
          • J. Kelley.
          • Election Monitoring: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.
          • Stockholm, Sweden:
          • December, 2011.
          • J. Kelley.
          • The Role of Membership Rules in Regional Organizations.
          • Asian Development Bank,
          • June 2010.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This paper explores how different membership models affect the ability of organizations to reduce regional heterogeneity and promote integration. The paper studies the advantages and disadvantages of different membership models, ranging from inclusive convoys to exclusive clubs. It argues that convoys have advantages in certain areas of cooperation, but that generally clubs offer a wider and stronger array of tools of influence. However, because all regions face constraints in terms of existing institutional arrangements, the paper explores ways that regions can alter their existing structure to progress along the path of integration. The paper also discusses the benefits of having multiple regional organizations in a form of layered integration. Drawing especially on the European experience, the paper then discusses modes of differential integration and options for varying membership based on specific instances of cooperation within an existing organization. The paper ends by considering the implications for Asia.

      • Books

          • J. Kelley.
          • Monitoring Democracy: When International Election Observation Works and Why it Often Fails.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2012.
          Publication Description

          http://www.duke.edu/web/diem/book.html

      • Book Reviews

          • J. Kelley.
          • Book Review: Lee Feinstein and Tod Lindberg, Means to an End: US Interests in the International Criminal Court Brookings, 2009.
          • Human Rights Review
          • 2011
          • .12
          • (December, 2011)
          • :
          • 137-138.
          • J. Kelley.
          • Book review The Pseudo-Democrat's Dilemma: Why Election Observation Became an International Norm. By Susan Hyde. (Cornell University Press, 2011.
          • Journal of Politics
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
          • J. Kelley.
          • Book Review: Lee Feinstein and Tod Lindberg, Means to an End: US Interests in the International Criminal Court Brookings, 2009.
          • Human Rights Review
          • 2011
          • .12
          • (Online first, February, 2010)
          • :
          • 137-138.
    • Kirshner, Alexander S.

      • Books

          • A.S. Kirshner.
          • A Theory of Militant Democracy: The Ethics of Combating Political Extremism.
          • Yale University Press,
          • January 7, 2014.
          • [web]
    • Kirshner, Alexander

      • Papers Submitted

          • A.S. Kirshner.
          • "Ostracism, Legitimate Opposition, and the Law of Democracy in Ancient Athens."
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In this essay I overturn a long standing belief that the practice of legitimate opposition was discovered in the late 18th century in United States and Great Britain. Examining the institutions and practices of fifth century Athens, I show that the Athenians engaged in the practice. I draw out a series of important normative and theoretical implications on the basis of this conclusion.

      • Journal Articles

          • A.S. Kirshner.
          • "Proceduralism and Popular Threats to Democracy."
          • Journal of Political Philosophy
          • 18
          • .4
          • (December, 2010)
          • :
          • 405-424.
      • Books

          • Ian Shapiro, Susan Stokes, Elisabeth Wood, Alexander Kirshner.
          • Political Representation.
          • Cambridge,
          • 2010.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          http://www.cambridge.org/mx/academic/subjects/politics-international-relations/political-theory/political-representation

    • Kitschelt, Herbert P

      • Chapters in Books

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • "Parties and Party Systems."
          • Comparing Democracies 4: Elections and Voting in a Changing World.
          • Ed. Larry LeDuc, Richard G. Niemi and Pippa Norris.
          • Beverly Hills:
          • Sage Publications,
          • Spring, 2014.
          Publication Description

          The paper provides a textbook style overview of theories of party competition and citizen-politician linkage and principal-agent relations.

    • Kitschelt, Herbert

      • Journal Articles

          • H.P. Kitschelt and Philipp Rehm.
          • ""Occupations as a Site for Political Preference Formation"."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • likely 47 or 48
          • .?
          • Beverly Hills:
          • Sage Publications,
          • (2014)
          • :
          • ?.
          Publication Description

          The paper explains how occupational experiences shape three dimensions of political preference formation: concerning income distribution, libertarian or authoritarian political governance, and exclusionary or inclusionary conceptions of political citizenship. The paper involves extensive statistical analysis.

          • H.P. Kitschelt and Daniel Kselman.
          • "Economic Development, Democratic Experience, and Political Parties’ Linkage Strategies."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • 46
          • .?
          • Sage,
          • (2013)
          • :
          • ?.
          • H.P. Kitschelt, Lenka Bustokova (co-author).
          • "The radical right in post-communist Europe. Comparative perspectives on legacies and party competition.."
          • Communist and Post-Communist Studies.
          • 42
          • .4
          • (Fall, 2009)
          • :
          • 459-83.
          Publication Description

          We investigate the effect of welfare state retrenchment on vote support for radical right parties in the 2000s. In countries with a legacy of national accommodative communism, early differentiation of major parties on socio-cultural issues and strategies of social policy compensation kept reform losers at bay, which limited votrer success of radical parties. Highly polarized patrimonial regimes, on the contrary, are the most fertile breeding ground for the radial right due to the high levels of inequality and dissatisfation resulting from a rapid dismantling of the welfare state.

      • Chapters in Books

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • "Social Class and Radical Right. Conceptualizing Political Preference Formation and Partisan Choice."
          • Class Politics and the Radical Right.
          • Milton Park, Abingdon, England and New York:
          • Routledge,
          • January, 2013.
          • 224-51.
          • Herbert Kitschelt and Melina Altamirano.
          • "Clientelism in Latin America. Effort and Effectiveness."
          • The Latin American Voter.
          • Ed. Ryan C. Carlin, Matt Singer, and Elizabeth Zechmeister.
          • most likely: University of Michigan Press,
          • 2013.
          Publication Description

          The paper explains where and why Latin American voters build clientelistic linkages to parties, and why sometimes, but not always, parties make efforts to provide clientelistic targeted goods to voters that remain unreciprocated by voters' partisan choices. The paper involves an original dataset and extensive statistical analysis.

          • H.P. Kitschelt and David M. Wineroither.
          • "Die Entwicklung des Parteienwettbewerbs in Oesterreich im internationalen Vergleich."
          • Die oesterreichische Demokratie im Vergleich.
          • Ed. Ludger Helms and David M. Wineroither.
          • Baden-Baden and Vienna:
          • Nomos Verlag,
          • 2012.
          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • "Parties and Interest Intermediation."
          • The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology..
          • Oxford:
          • Wiley-Blackwell,
          • 2011.
          • H.P. Kitschelt and Lenka Bustikova.
          • "“The Radical Right in Post-communist Europe. Comparative Perspectives on Party Competition.”."
          • Europeanizing Political Parties. Comparative Perspectives on Central and Eastern urope..
          • 2011.
          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • "Post-Industrial Democracies: Political Economy and Democratic Partisan Competition."
          • Sage Handbook of Comparative Politics.
          • Ed. Todd Landman and Neil Robinson.
          • London:
          • Sage Publisher,
          • April, 2009.
          • 195-225.
          Publication Description

          The paper reconstructs the development of the field of comparative political economy since the early 1980s as a steady complexification of theoretical models to increase the empirical explanatory reach of analysis.

      • Monographs

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • The Dynamics of Party Systems in Postindustrial Democracies..
          • Huddinge/Stockholm::
          • Södertörn University Press,
          • 2013.
          Publication Description

          Examines rival theories of party system change in postindustrial capitalism and provides evidence that realignment theories are most consistent with the data.

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • Programmatic Parties and Party Systems. Final Report. (125pp).
          • Stockholm:
          • International IDEA,
          • 2012.
          • (Project final report, to be published by IDEA.).
          • H.P. Kitschelt and Yi-ting Wang, editors and contributors.
          • Programmatic Parties and Party Systems. Case Study Compendium (255pp).
          • Stockholm:
          • International IDEA,
          • 2012.
          • (Edited case study compendium accompanying the main report.).
      • Other

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • "“A Europe in Crisis. The Crisis of the Euro and the European Union.”."
          • Duke International Relations Association Newsletter
          • 1
          • (September 14, 2012)
          • :
          • 4-9.
      • Book Reviews

          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • Review of Alan Ware. The Dynamics of Two-Party Politics. Party Structure and the Management of Competition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009d.
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 10
          • (2012)
          • .
          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • Review of Alan Ware. The Dynamics of Two-Party Politics. Party Structure and the Management of Competition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009..
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 10 or 11
          • (2011)
          • .
          • H.P. Kitschelt.
          • Review of Reuven Y. Hazan and Gideon Rahat. Democracy Within Parties: Candidate Selection Methods and their Political Consequences.
          • Political Science Quarterly
          • (2011)
          • .
      • Books

          • with
          • Herbert Kitschelt, Kirk Hawkins, Juan Pablo Luna, Guillermo Rosas and Elizabeth Zechmeister.
          • Latin American Party Systems.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • February, 2010.
          Publication Description

          Based on a survey of legislators in 12 Latin American countries, the first part of the book develops empirical measures of the political alignments that prevail in these countries and the differential relevance of political alignments ("programmatic structuration"). The second part of the book goes systematically through a range of explanations why party systems develop "stronger" or "weaker" political alignments and what the consequences thereof may be for the political economy and regime stability of current Latin American polities.

    • Knight, Jack

      • Journal Articles

          • Jack Knight and Lee Epstein.
          • "Reconsidering Judicial Preferences."
          • Annual Review of Political Science
          • (2013)
          • .
          • Jack Knight and Mitu Gulati.
          • "Talking Judges."
          • Duke Law Journal
          • (2010)
          • .
          • Jack Knight.
          • ""Are Empiricists Asking the Right Questions about Judicial-Decisionmaking?"."
          • Duke Law Journal
          • (2009)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • Jack Knight.
          • "How Do Courts Establish and Maintain Legitimacy?."
          • Oxford Handbook of the Law and Judiciary.
          • Ed. Lee Epstein and Stefanie Lindquist.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2013.
          • Jack Knight.
          • "Five Questions."
          • Five Questions on Pragmatism.
          • Ed. James Johnson.
          • New York:
          • Aotomatic Press/VIP,
          • 2011.
          • Jack Knight.
          • ""Causal Mechanisms and Generalizations"."
          • Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice.
          • Ed. Chris Mantzavinos.
          • Cambridge:
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2009.
      • Books

          • Jack Knight and James Johnson.
          • The Priority of Democracy: Political Consequences of Pragmatism.
          • Princeton University Press/Russell Sage Foundation Press,
          • September, 2011.
    • Krishna, Anirudh

      • Journal Articles

          • A. Krishna and K. Ananthpur.
          • "Distance and Diseases: Spatial Health Disparities in Rural India.."
          • Millennial Asia (Inaugural Sage Edition)
          • (January, 2013)
          • .
          • A. Krishna.
          • "The Mixed News on Poverty."
          • Current History
          • (January, 2013)
          • .
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Examining the Structures of Opportunity and Social Mobility in India: Who Becomes an Engineer."
          • Development and Change
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Stuck in Place: Investigating Social Mobility in 14 Bangalore Slums.."
          • Journal of Development Studies
          • 49
          • .7
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 1010-28.
          • Anirudh Krishna, Meri Poghosyan, and Narayan Das..
          • "“How Much Can Asset Transfers Help the Poorest? Evaluating the Results of BRAC’s Ultra-Poor Programme (2002-2008).”."
          • Journal of Development Studies
          • 48
          • .2
          • (February, 2012)
          • :
          • 184-97.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Characteristics and Patterns of Intergenerational Poverty Traps and Escapes in Rural North India."
          • Development Policy Review
          • 30
          • .5
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 617-40.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "The Spatial Dimension of Inter-Generational Education Achievement in Rural India."
          • Indian Journal of Human Development
          • 62
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 245-66.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Gaining Access to Public Services and the Democratic State in India: Institutions in the Middle.”."
          • Studies in Comparative International Development
          • 46
          • .1
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 98-117.
          • Anirudh Krishna and Devendra Bajpai.
          • "“Lineal Spread and Radial Dissipation: Experiencing Growth in Rural India, 1993-2005.”."
          • Economic and Political Weekly
          • 46
          • .44-51
          • (September 17)
          • .
          • A. Krishna and A. Shariff.
          • "The Irrelevance of National Strategies? Rural Poverty Dynamics in States and Regions of India, 1993-2005."
          • World Development
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Continuity and Change: The Indian Administrative Service 30 years ago and today."
          • Commonwealth and Comparative Politics
          • 48
          • .4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 433-44.
          • P. Kristjanson, A. Krishna, N. Mango, N. Johnson, and M. Radeny.
          • "Understanding Poverty Dynamics in Kenya."
          • Journal of International Development
          • 22
          • .7
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 978-96.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Who Became Poor, Who Escaped Poverty, and Why? Developing and Using a Retrospective Methodology in Five Countries."
          • Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • A. Krishna.
          • "The Naya Netas: Informal Mediators of Government Services in Rural North India."
          • The Politics of Non-State Social Welfare Provision in the Global South.
          • Ed. Melanie Cammett and Lauren Maclean.
          • Cornell University Press,
          • forthcoming.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Politics and Development at the Grassroots: Missing Links in the Institutional Chain."
          • Oxford Handbook on the Politics of Development.
          • Ed. Nicolas Van de Walle and Carol Lancaster.
          • forthcoming.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Dealing with a Distant State: The Evolving Nature of Local Politics in India."
          • Oxford Companion to Politics in India.
          • Ed. Niraja Gopal Jayal and Pratap Bhanu Mehta.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2010.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Are More People Becoming Vulnerable to Poverty? Evidence from Grassroots Investigations in Five Countries."
          • Globalization and Emerging Societies: Development and Inequality.
          • Ed. Boike Rehbein and Jan Nederveen Pieterse.
          • Palgrave Macmillan,
          • 2009.
          • 61-82.
          • K. Ananthpur and A. Krishna.
          • "Formal Perceptions of Informal Justice."
          • Strengthening Governance through Access to Justice.
          • Ed. Amita Singh and Nasir Aslam Zahid.
          • New Delhi: PHI Learning,
          • 2009.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "The Dynamics of Poverty: Why Don’t “the Poor” Act Collectively?."
          • The Poorest and Hungry: Assessments, Analyses, and Actions.
          • Ed. Joachim von Braun, Ruth Vargas-Hill, and Rajul Pandya-Lorch.
          • Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute.,
          • 2009.
          • 411-420.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Subjective Assessments, Participatory Methods and Poverty Dynamics: The Stages Of Progress Method."
          • Poverty Dynamics.
          • Ed. Tony Addison and David Hulme.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
          • 183-201.
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Subjective Assessments, Participatory Methods and Poverty Dynamics: The Stages of Progress Method."
          • Poverty Dynamics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives.
          • Ed. Tony Addison, David Hulme, and Ravi Kanbur.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
      • Papers Submitted

          • A. Krishna.
          • "Examining the Structures of Opportunity and Social Mobility in India: Who Becomes an Engineer?."
          • Development and Change
          • (August, 2012)
          • .
          • (Revised and resubmitted)
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Stuck in Place: Investigating Social Mobility in 14 Bangalore Slums."
          • Journal of Development Studies
          • (2012)
          • .
          • (revised and resubmitted)
          • A. Krishna and G. Schober.
          • "The Gradient of Governance: Distance and Disenchantment in Rural India."
          • Journal of Politics
          • (2012)
          • .
          • A. Krishna and A. Sarin.
          • "Management Education in India: Avenue for Social Stratification or Social Mobility?."
          • World Development
          • (2012)
          • .
          • A. Krishna.
          • "Distance and Inter-generational Education Achievements: Examining Rural Areas of Two Indian States."
          • Indian Journal of Human Development
          • (2012)
          • .
      • Books

          • A. Krishna.
          • One Illness Away: How People Escape Poverty and Why they Become Poor.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2010.
      • Book Reviews

          • A. Krishna.
          • The Rich Financial Lives of Poor People.
          • Science
          • (forthcoming)
          • .
      • Other Working Papers

          • A. Krishna.
          • "The Missing Middle: Development, Democracy, and Connecting Institutions."
          • 2009.
    • Kuran, Timur

      • Chapters in Books

          • T. Kuran.
          • "Banks and Banking."
          • Encyclopedia of Islam, 3rd. ed..
          • Leiden:
          • Brill,
          • 2014.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • ""Interview with Vincent Hendricks"."
          • Socio-Epistemic Phenomena: 5 Questions.
          • Ed. Rasmus K. Rendsvig and Vincent F. Hendricks.
          • Copenhagen:
          • Automatic Press / VIP,
          • 2013.
          • in press.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Public opinion."
          • Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2012.
          • 435-36.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Economic theory."
          • Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2012.
          • 142-44.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Political Consequences of the Middle East’s Economic Legacy."
          • Institutions and Patterns of Economic Development: Proceedings of the Sixteenth World Congress of the International Economic Association, vol. 1.
          • Ed. Masahoki Aoki, Timur Kuran, and Gerard Roland.
          • New York:
          • Palgrave-Macmillan,
          • 2012.
          • 99-115.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Economic Development in the Middle East: The Historical Roles of Culture, Institutions, and Religion,."
          • Ed. Jean-Philippe Platteau.
          • New York: Routledge,
          • 2010.
          • 87-102.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "The Scale of Entrepreneurship in Middle Eastern History: Inhibitive Roles of Islamic Institutions."
          • Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship in Economic History.
          • Ed. William J. Baumol, David S. Landes, and Joel Mokyr.
          • Princeton:
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 62-87.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "The Rule of Law in Islamic Thought and Practice: A Historical Perspective."
          • Global Perspectives on the Rule of Law.
          • Ed. James J. Heckman, Robert L. Nelson, and Lee Cabatingan.
          • Routledge,
          • 2010.
          • 71-89.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Modern Islam and the Economy."
          • New Cambridge History of Islam
          • .
          • Ed. Michael Cook, Robert Hefner.
          • 6
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 473-94.
      • Journal Articles

          • Timur Kuran and Anantdeep Singh.
          • "Economic Modernization Late British India: Hindu-Muslim Differences."
          • Economic Development and Cultural Change
          • 61
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 503-38.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "The Political Consequences of Islam’s Economic Legacy."
          • Philosophy and Social Criticism
          • 39
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 345-405.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Religious Obstacles to Democratization in the Middle East: Past and Present."
          • The Wealth and Well-Being of Nations
          • 5
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 17-39.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Synergies between Middle Eastern Economic History and the Analytic Social Sciences."
          • International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
          • 44
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 542-45.
          • Timur Kuran and Scott Lustig.
          • "Judicial Biases in Ottoman Istanbul: Islamic Justice and Its Compatibility with Modern Economic Life."
          • Journal of Law and Economics
          • 55
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 631-66.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "The Economic Roots of Political Underdevelopment in the Middle East: A Historical Perspective."
          • Southern Economic Journal
          • 79
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 1086-95.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "West is Best? Why Civilizations Rise and Fall."
          • Foreign Affairs
          • 90
          • (January, 2011)
          • :
          • 159-63.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Explaining the Economic Trajectories of Civilizations: The Systemic Approach."
          • Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
          • 71
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 593-605.
      • Other

          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Arap Demokrasilerinin Zayıf Temelleri."
          • Optimist
          • (November, 2012)
          • :
          • 92-93.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Building Arab Civil Society to Promote Economic Growth."
          • The Compendium on Unemployment in the Arab World 2012, World Economic Forum, 4-6.
          • June 2012.
          • 15-17.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Phase III of the Arab World’s Modernization: Building Accountability and Boosting Creativity."
          • The Compendium on Economic Governance in the Arab World 2011, World Economic Forum.
          • October, 2011.
          • 10-11.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "The Weak Foundations of Arab Democracy."
          • New York Times
          • (May 29, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Legal Roots of Economic Underdevelopment in the Middle East."
          • European Financial Review
          • (February, 2011)
          • .
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Excerpt of Long Divergence."
          • Milken Institute Review
          • 13
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 59-76.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • "Preface: The economic impact of culture, religion, and the law."
          • Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
          • 71
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 589-592.
          • Timur Kuran, guest editor.
          • "The Economic Performance of Civilizations: Roles of Culture, Religion, and the Law."
          • Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
          • 71
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 589-717.
      • Books

          • Aptullah Kuran.
          • Selçuklular’dan Cumhuriyet’e Türkiye’de Mimarlık / Architecture in Turkey from the Seljuks to the Republic.
          • Istanbul:
          • İş Bank Publications,
          • 2012.
          • (önsöz/preface by Timur Kuran, giriş/introduction by Kafesçioğlu and Thys-Şenocak).
          • Masahiko Aoki, Timur Kuran, and Gerard Roland (editors).
          • Institutions and Patterns of Economic Development: Proceedings of the Sixteenth World Congress of the International Economic Association, vol. 1.
          • New York:
          • Palgrave Macmillan,
          • 2012.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • Al Islam Wal Thara’al-Fahish: Ma’zaq Al Iqtisad al-Islami (Amman: al-Ahliyya.
          • Amman:
          • Al-Ahliyya,
          • 2012.
          • (Arabic translation of 2004 book, Islam and Mammon, with a special preface for Arab readers.).
          • Timur Kuran.
          • Yollar Ayrılırken: Orta Doğu’nun Geri Kalma Sürecinde İslam Hukuku’nun Rolü.
          • Istanbul (Turkish translation of 2011 book, The Long Divergence):
          • YKY,
          • 2012.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2011.
          • Timur Kuran.
          • (Ed.) Mahkeme Kayıtları Işığında 17. Yüzyıl İstanbul’unda Sosyo-Ekonomik Yaşam / Social and Economic Life in Seventeenth-Century Istanbul: Glimpses from Court Records, Vols. 1-10.
          • Istanbul: İş Bankası Kültür Yayınları,,
          • 2010-13.
      • Book Reviews

          • Timur Kuran.
          • Ghislaine Lydon, On Trans-Saharan Trails: Islamic Law, Trade Networks, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Nineteenth-Century Western Africa.
          • Journal of Economic History
          • 69
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 1182-84.
    • Leventoglu, Bahar

      • Journal Articles

          • with
          • Ahmer Tarar.
          • ""Limited Audience Costs in International Crises"."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • (2012)
          • .
          • (Forthcoming)
          • "Social Mobility, Middle Class and Political Transitions."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • (2012)
          • .
          • (Forthcoming)
          • with
          • David Epstein, Sharyn O'Halloran.
          • "Minorities and Democratization."
          • Economics and Politics
          • 24
          • .3
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 259-278.
          • Ahmer Tarar and Bahar Leventoglu.
          • "Public Commitment in Crisis Bargaining."
          • International Studies Quarterly.
          • 53
          • .3
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 817-839.
    • Maghraoui, Abdeslam E.

      • Papers Published

          • Abdeslam Maghraoui.
          • ""The Perverse Effect of 'Good Governance': Lessons from Morocco"."
          • Middle East Policy
          • .
          • Ed. Middle East Policy Council.
          • XIX
          • .2
          • (Summer, 2012)
          • .
          • [web]
    • Maghraoui, Abdeslam

      • Chapters in Books

          • Abdeslam Maghraoui.
          • "The King's Islamists."
          • The Islamists are Coming: Who they Really Are.
          • Ed. Robin Wright.
          • US Institute of Peace Press,
          • 2012.
          • [web]
          • Abdeslam Maghraoui.
          • "American Foreign Policy and Islamic Renewal."
          • Conflict, Identity, and Reform in the Muslim World.
          • Ed. Daniel Brumberg and Dina Shehata.
          • USIP Press,
          • 2009.
          • [web]
    • Malesky, Edmund J

      • Journal Articles

          • E.J. Malesky and P. Schuler.
          • "Star Search: Do Elections Help Nondemocratic Regimes Identify New Leaders?."
          • Journal of East Asian Studies
          • FORTHCOMING
          • (2013)
          • .
          Publication Description

          A commonly proffered theory to explain the use of elections in authoritarian regimes is that they help identify talented young leaders who can be groomed for leadership positions. Unfortunately, due to the difficulties of obtaining data in authoritarian settings, this hypothesis has not been tested satisfactorily. We examine candidate-level data from the 2007 Vietnamese National Assembly (VNA) election and subsequent selection of candidates for top positions within the VNA and for top ministry positions. We find no evidence that vote share is associated with promotion to leadership positions in the VNA and only limited evidence for vote share association with ministerial posts. Instead, the results indicate that leadership selection takes place within the party rather than through elections. Furthermore, behavior within the assembly suggests that those who were chosen may have been selected based on their loyalty or at least pliancy to the party elites.

    • Malesky, Edmund

      • Journal Articles

          • N. Jensen, E.J. Malesky, and Stephen Weymouth.
          • "Unbundling the Relationship between Authoritarian Legislatures and Political Risk."
          • British Journal of Politics
          • FORTHCOMING
          • (2013)
          • .
          Publication Description

          A growing literature demonstrates a strong statistical association between the presence of legislative opposition in authoritarian regimes and investment. This finding has been interpreted as evidence that authoritarian legislatures constrain executive decisions and therefore reduce the threat of expropriation. Although the empirical relationship is robust, the micro-logic of the relationship between authoritarian legislatures and property rights is both theoretically unsatisfying and empirically untested. Scholars have not provided systematic evidence that authoritarian parliaments are able to restrain the actions of state leaders, reverse activities they disagree with, or remove authoritarian leaders who violate the implied power-sharing arrangement. In this article, we provide an alternative explanation for the robust correlation. We argue that authoritarian legislatures, by providing a forum for horse trading between multiple private actors, are far better at generating corporate governance legislation that protects investors from the avarice of corporate insiders than they are at preventing expropriation by governments. Our statistical analysis reveals that the strength of authoritarian legislatures is associated with corporate governance rules and not expropriation risk.

          • T.M. Dinh, E.J. Malesky, T.T. To, D.T. Nguyen.
          • "The Effect of Interest Rate Subsidies on Firm Performance and Investment Behavior during Economic Recession: Evidence from Vietnam."
          • Journal of Asian Economics
          • FORTHCOMING
          • (2013)
          • .
          Publication Description

          This paper aims to quantitatively evaluate the microeconomic consequences of the four percent interest rate subsidy program – the main component of the Vietnamese government’s economic stimulus package in 2009¬, which was intended assist recovery from the global economic and financial recession. Our analyses based on the Provincial Competitive Index (PCI) 2009 survey and accounting data of firms listed on Vietnam’s two stock exchanges show that firms receiving subsidized loans were more likely to add labor, expand investment, and possess optimistic business plans. On the other hand, we find evidence that not all business activity generated by the stimulus led to productivity increases - a non-trivial proportion of subsidized loans were not used to invest in production or expansion, but for speculative activities such as real estate and stock market trading.

          • M. Cammet and E.J. Malesky.
          • "Power-Sharing in Post-Conflict Societies: Implications for Peace and Governance."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 56
          • (December, 2012)
          • :
          • 982-1016.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Which components of power sharing contribute to the duration of peace and what explains the linkages between institutional design and stability? The authors argue that certain types of political power sharing are associated with more durable peace than others, primarily through their positive effects on governance and public service delivery. In particular, closed-list proportional representation (PR) electoral systems stand out among power-sharing arrangements, due to their ability to deliver superior governance outcomes which, in turn, can promote stability by undercutting the initial motivations for conflict or by reducing the feasibility of rebellion. The authors argue that these positive outcomes result from closed-list PR’s ability to increase party discipline and checks on executive power, while reducing incentives for personalistic voting. The introduction of political institutions in postconflict negotiated settlements allows us to test the independent effects of institutions on governance and stability using survival analysis and a case study.

          • E.J. Malesky, P. Schuler, A. Tran.
          • "The Adverse Effects of Sunshine: A Field Experiment on Legislative Transparency in an Authoritarian Assembly.."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 106
          • .4
          • (November, 2012)
          • :
          • 762-786.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          An influential literature has demonstrated that legislative transparency can improve the performance of parliamentarians in democracies. In a democracy, the incentive for improved performance is created by voters’ responses to newly available information. Building on this work, donor projects have begun to export transparency interventions to authoritarian regimes under the assumption that nongovernmental organizations and the media can substitute for the incentives created by voters. Such interventions, however, are at odds with an emerging literature that argues that authoritarian parliaments primarily serve the role of co-optation and limited power sharing, where complaints can be raised in a manner that does not threaten regime stability. We argue that under these conditions, transparency may have perverse effects, and we test this theory with a randomized experiment on delegate behavior in query sessions in Vietnam, a single-party authoritarian regime. We find no evidence of a direct effect of the transparency treatment on delegate performance; however, further analysis reveals that delegates subjected to high treatment intensity demonstrate robust evidence of curtailed participation and damaged reelection prospects. These results make us cautious about the export of transparency without electoral sanctioning.

          • D. Georguiev and E.J. Malesky.
          • "Foreign investment and bribery: A firm-level analysis of corruption in Vietnam."
          • Journal of Asian Economics
          • 23
          • .2
          • (Fall, 2012)
          • :
          • 111-129.
          • E.J. Malesky and P. Schuler.
          • "Nodding or Needling: Analyzing Delegate Responsiveness in an Authoritarian Parliament."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 104
          • .3
          • (August, 2012)
          • :
          • 482-502.
          • E.J. Malesky.
          • "The Single-Party Dictator’s Dilemma: Information in Elections Without Opposition.."
          • Legislative Studies Quaterly
          • 35
          • .4
          • (Winter, 2011)
          • :
          • 491-530.
          • E.J. Malesky AND N. Merchant-Vega.
          • "A Peek under the Engine Hood: The Methodology of Subnational Economic Governance Indices."
          • Hague Journal on the Rule of Law
          • 3
          • .2
          • (September, 2011)
          • :
          • 186-219.
          • [web]
          • E.J. Malesky, R. Abrami, Y. Zheng.
          • "Accountability and Inequality in Single-Party Regimes: A Comparative Analysis of Vietnam and China.."
          • Comparative Politics
          • 43
          • .4
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 401-421.
          • E.J. Malesky, P. Schuler, A. Tran.
          • "Vietnam 2010: Familiar Patterns and New Developments Ahead of the 11th Vietnam Communist Party Congress."
          • Southeast Asian Affairs
          • 2011
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 339-363.
          • E.J. Malesky.
          • "Political Economy of International Capital Flows."
          • Prepared for The Encyclopedia of Financial Globalization
          • .
          • Ed. erard Caprio.
          • Elsevier Publishing Inc.,
          • (2011)
          • .
          • N. Jensen and E.J. Malesky.
          • "FDI Incentives Pay – Politically."
          • Vale Columbia FDI Perspectives
          • 26
          • (June, 2010)
          • .
          • S. Gehlbach and E.J. Malesky.
          • "The Contribution of Veto Players to Economic Reform."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 72
          • .4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 957-975.
          • E.J. Malesky and M. Taussig.
          • "Out of the Gray: The Impact of Provincial Institutions on Business Formalization in Vietnam."
          • Journal of East Asian Studies
          • 9
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 249-290.
          • E.J. Malesky.
          • "Foreign Investors: Agents of Economic Transition. An Instrumental Variables Analysis."
          • Quarterly Journal of Political Science
          • 4
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 59-85.
          • E.J. Malesky.
          • "Gerrymandering Vietnam Style: Escaping the Partial Reform Equilibrium in a Non-Democratic Regime."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 71
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 132-159.
      • Chapters in Books

          • S. Gehlbach and E.J. Malesky.
          • "The Grand Experiment that Wasn’t? New Institutional Economics and the Postcommunist Experience."
          • Economic Institutions, Rights, Growth, and Sustainability: the Legacy of Douglass North.
          • Ed. Sebastian Galiani and Itai Sened.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2013.
          • R. Abrami, E.J. Malesky, and Y. Zheng.
          • "Vietnam through Chinese Eyes: Divergent Accountability in Single- Party Regimes."
          • Why Communism Didn’t Collapse: Understanding Regime Resilience in China, Vietnam, Laos, North Korea, and Cuba.
          • Ed. Martin Dimitrov.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2013.
      • Books

          • E.J. Malesky.
          • Politics and Foreign Direct Investment.
          • Ann Arbor:
          • University of Michigan Press,
          • 2012.
      • Monographs

          • E.J. Malesky.
          • The Vietnam Provincial Competitiveness Index: Measuring Economic Governance for Private Sector Development..
          • US-AID: Hanoi, Vietnam,
          • Vietnam Competitiveness Initiative and Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry,
          • Annual Report (2005-2012).
    • Mayer, Frederick W.

      • Books

          • F.W. Mayer.
          • Narrative and Collective Action.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • Forthcoming.
    • Mayer, Frederick

      • Journal Articles

          • S. Barrientos, F.W. Mayer. J. Pickles, and A. Posthuma.
          • "Decent work in global production networks: Framing the policy debate."
          • International Labour Review
          • 150
          • .3-4
          • (December, 2011)
          • .
          • G. Gereffi and F.W. Mayer.
          • "Regulation and Economic Globalization: Prospects and Limits of Private Governance."
          • Business and Politics
          • 12
          • .3
          • (2010)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • F.W. Mayer.
          • "Multi-level games."
          • Handbook on Multi-Level Governance.
          • Ed. H. Enderlein et al.
          • Edward Elgar,
          • 2011.
    • McClain, Paula D.

      • Books

          • P.D. McClain and Joseph Stewart, Jr..
          • "Can We All Get Along?" Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics 6th edition.
          • (Boulder: Westview Press, 2014),
          • 2014.
    • McClain, Paula

      • Books

          • P.D. McClain and Steven C. Tauber.
          • American Government in Black and White, 2nd edition.
          • (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014),
          • 2014.
          • James Alt, Simone Chambers, Geoffrey Garrett, Margaret Levi, Paula D. McClain.
          • The Encyclopedia of Political Science.
          • Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2010,
          • October, 2010.
          • (This encylclopedia consists of five volumes with a total of 1801 pages.).
          • P.D. McClain and Steven C. Tauber.
          • American Government in Black and White.
          • Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers, 2010,
          • February, 2010.
          • Paula D. McClain and Joseph Stewart, Jr..
          • "Can We All Get Along?" Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics 5th edition.
          • Boulder: Westview Press, 2010 (Published in July 2009),
          • July, 2009.
      • Book Reviews

          • P.D. McClain.
          • Review Symposium, Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer--And Turned its Back on the Middle Class, by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson.
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 9
          • .3
          • (September, 2011)
          • :
          • 651-654.
      • Chapters in Books

          • P.D. McClain, Gerald F. Lackey, Efrén O. Peréz, Niambi M. Carter, Jessica Johnson Carew, Eugene Walton, Jr., Candis S. Watts, Monique L. Lyle and Shayla C. Nunnally..
          • "Intergroup Relations in Three Southern Cities.."
          • .Just Neighbors? Research on African American and Latino Relations in the United States..
          • Ed. Edward Telles, Gaspar Rivera-Salgado and Sylvia Zamora, editors..
          • Russell Sage Foundation,
          • 2011.
      • Journal Articles

          • McClain, Paula D., Jessica Johnson Carew, Eugene Walton, Jr. and Candis S.Watts.
          • "“Group Membership, Group Identity and Group Consciousness: Evolving Racial Identity in American Politics.”."
          • Annual Review of Political Science
          • 12 (June 2009)
          • (June, 2009)
          • :
          • 471-485.
    • Mickiewicz, Ellen

      • Other

          • E. Mickiewicz.
          • "Policy Applications of Public Opinion Research in the Soviet Union."
          • Public Opinion Quarterly
          • (Winter, 1972-1973)
          • .
    • Munger, Michael C.

      • Journal Articles

          • J. D. Grynaviski and M.C. Munger.
          • "Did Southerners Favor Slavery? Inferences from an Analysis of Prices in New Orleans, 1805-1860."
          • Public Choice
          • (2015)
          • .
    • Munger, Michael

      • Journal Articles

          • H.G. Brennan and M.C. Munger.
          • "“The Soul of James Buchanan.”."
          • Independent Reivew
          • 18
          • .3
          • (Winter, 2013)
          • :
          • 331-342.
          • R. A. Guzman and M.C. Munger.
          • "“Freedom of Contract and the Morality of Exchange: Examples From Locke’s Venditio.”."
          • Public Choice
          • (February 2014)
          • .
          Publication Description

          (with Ricardo Guzman). Public Choice.

          • M.C. Munger and R. Salsman.
          • "“Is ‘Too Big to Fail’ Too Big?”."
          • Georgetown Journal of Law & Public Policy
          • 11
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 433-456.
          • K. M. Munger and M.C. Munger.
          • "“Competencia Spatial en América Latina: Una visión general de algunos modelos ilustrativos.” (Spatial Competition in Latin America: A Review of Some Illustrative Models)."
          • Revista Mexicana de Analisis Politico y Administracion Publica
          • 4
          • .2
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 33-40.
          • J. Aldrich, M.C. Munger, and J. Reifler.
          • "Institutions, Information, and Faction: An Experimental Test of Riker’s Federalism Thesis for Political Parties."
          • Public Choice
          • (2013)
          • .
          • J. Aldrich, J. Reifler, and M. Munger.
          • "Sophisticated and myopic? Citizen preferences for Electoral College reform.."
          • Public Choice
          • (2013)
          • .
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "“Coercion, the State, and the Obligations of Citizenship”."
          • Public Choice
          • 152
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 415-421.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Voting methods, problems of majority rule, and demand-revealing procedures."
          • Public Choice
          • 152
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 61-72..
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Euvoluntary or Not, Exchange is Just."
          • Social Philosophy and Policy
          • Summer,
          • 28
          • .2
          • (Summer, 2011)
          • .
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Self-Interest and Public Interest: Motivations of Political Actors.."
          • Critical Review
          • 25
          • .1-2
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1-19.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Basic Income’ is Not an Obligation, But It Might Be a Legitimate Choice."
          • Basic Income Studies
          • 6
          • .2
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1-13.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Persuasion, Psychology, and the Future of Public Choice."
          • Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
          • 80
          • .2
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 290-300.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "“The Social Science of Democracy.” (Symposium on Jon Elster’s Tocqueville: The First Social Scientist),."
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • 9
          • .2
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 374-376.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "’Basic Income’ is Not an Obligation, But It Might Be a Legitimate Choice."
          • Basic Income Studies
          • 5
          • .2
          • (Winter, 2010)
          • .
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Endless Forms Most Beautiful and Most Wonderful."
          • Public Choice
          • 43
          • .1-2
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 263-268.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Thinking About Order Without Thought." In Tullock's Contributions to Spontaneous Order Studies."
          • Public Choice
          • 135
          • .3-4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 79-88.
          Publication Description

          "Thinking About Order Without Thought." In Tullock's Contributions to Spontaneous Order Studies, Public Choice Special Issue, 135: 79-88.

          • M.C. Munger.
          • "The Principal Difficulty: Besley’s Neo-Rousseauvian Aspirations."
          • Review of Austrian Economics
          • 22
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 169-175.
      • Chapters in Books

          • J. P. Couyoumdjian and M.C. Munger.
          • "“The Entrepreneurial Virtues”."
          • Philosophy of Character.
          • Ed. Iskra Fileva.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • November 2014.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "“Kaldor-Hicks Coercion, Coasian Bargaining, and the State.”."
          • Coercion and Social Welfare in Contemporary Public Policy.
          • Ed. Jorge Martinez and Stanley Winer.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • November 2014.
          • D. Gerard, W, Keech, and M.Munger.
          • "“The Political Economy of Sustainability,” (with David Gerard and William Keech).."
          • Chapter in Introduction to Sustainable Engineering, Cliff Davidson (ed). Prentice-Hall..
          • January 2015.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Political Science and Public Choice."
          • Elgar Companion to Public Choice II.
          • Ed. Michael Reksulak.
          • Edward Elgar Publishers,
          • March, 2013.
          • 81-106.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "“Euvoluntary Exchange and the Creation of Wealth,”."
          • Wealth Creation: Ethical & Economic Perspectives, David Schmidtz (ed.) Cognella Academic Publishing..
          • 2012.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Hayek's Insight: Order Without Direction, Benefit Without Intent."
          • Political Economy in Philosophic Perspective.
          • Ed. Greg Butler.
          • University Press of America,
          • 2013.
          • Wm Keech and M.C. Munger.
          • "Political Economy."
          • International Encyclopedia of Political Science.
          • Ed. Garrett, Levi, McClain, Alt, and Chambers.
          • Congressional Quarterly Press,
          • 2011.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "I have a real meeting at 10:30: Running for Office as a Third Party Candidate.”."
          • Inside Political Campaigns: Chronicles—And Lessons--From the Trenches.
          • Ed. James Bowers and Stephen Daniels.
          • Lynne Rienner Publishers,
          • 2010.
      • Books

          • M.C. Munger.
          • Choosing in Groups: Analytical Politics Revisited.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • October 2014.
          • ((in press)).
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Endless Forms Most Beatiful and Most Wonderful"--Special Issue of Public Choice--To Honor the Nobel Prize of Elinor Ostrom.
          • Springer-Verlag Publishers,
          • 2010.
      • Monographs

          • M.C. Munger.
          • “Everything You Know About Recycling is Wrong.”.
          • Symposium, The Political Economy of Recycling, edited by Jason Kuznicki.,
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          “Everything You Know About Recycling is Wrong.” (5,000 words). Cato Unbound June.

          • M.C. Munger.
          • “How to Write Less Badly” (Reprint 2010 article as book chapter).
          • 2012.
          • M.C. Munger.
          • “Locking Up Political Speech: How Electioneering Communications Laws Stifle Free Speech and Civic Engagement”.
          • Arlington, VA:
          • Institute for Justice,
          • June, 2009.
          • [web]
          • M.C. Munger.
          • "Market Makers or Parasites?".
          • Indianapolis, IN:
          • Liberty Fund, Inc.,
          • February, 2009.
          • [web]
          • M.C. Munger.
          • Planning Order, Causing Chaos: Transantiago.
          • EconLib, OLL, Liberty Fund,
          • 2009.
          • [web]
      • Book Reviews

          • M.C. Munger.
          • "War, the American State, and Politics since 1898," by Robert Saldin.
          • Independent Review
          • 17
          • .2
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 91-94.
          • [web]
          • M.C. Munger.
          • Saari's "Disposing Dictators, Demystifying Voting Paradoxes".
          • Public Choice
          • 140
          • .3-4
          • Springer Verlag,
          • 2009.
          • 539-543.
      • Papers Published

          • M.C. Munger, Peter Ordeshook, Tse-min Lin and Bryan Jones.
          • "In Memoriam: Melvin J. Hinich, 1939-2010."
          • Public Choice
          • 146
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1-8.
    • Niou, Emerson

      • Books

          • Emerson Niou.
          • Bean Voting: The History and Politics of Secret Ballot (in Chinese).
          • People's University Press,
          • 2014.
          • Emerson Niou and Peter Ordeshook.
          • Games and Politics.
          • Rutledge,
          • 2014.
          • Emerson Niou.
          • An Introduction to Community Compacts in China (in Chinese).
          • revised edition,
          • Chinese Society Press,
          • 2014.
      • Papers Published

          • Jianmin Song and Emerson Niou.
          • "“The Financial Politics of Local Self-Government in Japan”."
          • Fudan University Political Science Review
          • 13
          • (Winter, 2013)
          • :
          • 172-195.
      • Papers Submitted

          • E. Niou and Sean Zeigler.
          • "External Threats and Internal Rivalry: A Theory of Alliance Formation."
          • 2013.
          • Dean Lacy, Emerson Niou, and Philip Paolino.
          • "Measuring Preferences for Divided Government."
          • 2013.
          • Dean Lacy and Emerosn Niou.
          • "Information and Issue Voting in Taiwan."
          • 2013.
      • Chapters in Books

          • Dean Lacy and Emerson Niou.
          • "Nonseparable Preferences and Issue Packaging in Elections."
          • Advances in Political Economy: Instituions, Modeling, and Empirical Analysis.
          • Ed. Norman Schofield and Daniel Kselman.
          • Springer,
          • 2013.
      • Journal Articles

          • Dean Lacy and Emerson Niou.
          • "“Information and Heterogeneity in Issue Voting: Evidence from the 2008 Presidential Election in Taiwan,”."
          • Journal of East Asian Studies
          • (2012)
          • .
          • Emerson Niou.
          • "“The China Factor in Taiwanese Politics”."
          • Journal of Social Science, University of Tokyo
          • (2012, forthcoming.)
          • .
          • Daniel Kselman and Emerson Niou.
          • "Protest Voting in Plurality Elections: A Theory of Voter Signaling."
          • Public Choice
          • (Online First, June, 2010)
          • .
          • Daniel Kselman and Emerson Niou.
          • "Strategic Voting in Plurality Elections."
          • Political Analysis
          • 18
          • .2
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 227-244.
          Publication Description

          This paper extends McKelvey and Ordeshook’s (1972) Calculus of Voting, providing a direct derivation of the conditions under which voters will vote strategically: choose their second-most preferred candidate in order to prevent their least-preferred candidate from winning. Addressing this theoretical problem is important, as nearly all empirical research on strategic voting either implicitly or explicitly tests hypotheses which originate from this seminal model. The formal result allows us to isolate the subset of voters to which strategic voting hypotheses properly apply, and in turn motivates a critical reevaluation of past empirical work. In making this argument, we develop a unified and parsimonious framework for understanding competing models of tactical voter choice. The typology helps to elucidate the methodological difficulties in studying tactical behavior when faced with heterogeneous explanatory models, and suggests the need for both theoretical caution and more precise data instruments in future empirical work.

    • Paletz, David L

      • Chapters in Books

          • David L. Paletz.
          • "Sherman's March: Romantic Love in Documentary Films."
          • Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction.
          • Ed. Susan Wolf and Chris Grau.
          • New York:
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2014.
          • 231-250.
    • Paletz, David

      • Books

          • David L. Paletz, Diana Owen and Tim Cook.
          • American Government and Politics in the Information Age.
          • FlatWorldKnowledge,
          • 2012.
          • (Published both in print and online editions).
    • Remmer, Karen

      • Papers Accepted

          • K. Remmer.
          • "Exogenous Shocks and Democratic Accountability."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • forthcoming
          • (2013)
          • .
      • Journal Articles

          • K. Remmer.
          • "The Rise of Leftist-Populist Governance in Latin America."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • 45
          • (August, 2012)
          • :
          • 947-972.
          • K. Remmer.
          • ""The Impact of Political Scale on Turnout."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • (2010)
          • .
          • K. Remmer.
          • "“Why Do Small States have Big Governments?"."
          • European Political Science Review
          • (2010)
          • .
    • Rohde, David W

      • Journal Articles

          • Michael Crespin, Ryan Vander Wielen, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Measuring Variations in Party Unity Voting: An Assessment of Agenda Effects."
          • Party Politics
          • 19
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 432-457.
    • Rohde, David

      • Journal Articles

          • D.W. Rohde.
          • "Reflections on the Practice of Theorizing: Conditional Party Government in the Twenty- First Century."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 75
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 849-864.
          • Jeremy Duff and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Rules to Live By: Agenda Control and the Partisan Use of Special Rules in the House."
          • Congress and the Presidency
          • 39
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 28-50.
          • John H. Aldrich, Brittany N. Perry, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "House Appropriations After the Republican Revolution."
          • Congress and the Presidency
          • 39
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 229-253.
          • Sean Theriault and D.W. Rohde.
          • ""The Gingrich Senators and Party Polarization in the U.S. Senate."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 73
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 1011-1024.
          • Michael Crespin, D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Dimensions, Issues, and Bills: Appropriations Voting on the House Floor.”."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 72
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 976-989.
          • Jamie L. Carson, Charles J. Finocchiaro, D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Consensus, Conflict, and Partisanship in House Decision Making: A Bill-Level Examination of Committee and Floor Behavior.”."
          • Congress and the Presidency
          • 37
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 231-253.
      • Chapters in Books

          • John H. Aldrich, Brittany N. Perry, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Richard Fenno’s Theory of Congressional Committees and the Partisan Polarization of the House."
          • Congress Reconsidered, 10th ed..
          • Ed. Lawrence Dodd and Bruce Oppenheimer.
          • CQ Press,
          • 2013.
          • 193-220.
          • Aaron S. King, Frank J. Orlando, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Beyond Motions to Table: Exploring the Procedural Toolkit of the Majority Party in the United States Senate."
          • Party and Procedure in the United States Congres.
          • Ed. Jacob Straus.
          • Rowman and Littlefield,
          • 2012.
          • 173-194.
          • D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Looking Back to See Ahead: The Senate in the Twenty-First Century.”."
          • From Delay to Dysfunction: the U.S.Senate,1960-2010..
          • Ed. Burdett Loomis.
          • 2011.
          • 239-257.
          • Paul Abramson, John Aldrich, D.W. Rohde.
          • "“On Elections.”."
          • The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior.
          • Ed. Jan E. Leighley.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 700-715.
          • D.W. Rohde.
          • "“What a Difference 25 Years Makes: Changing Perspectives on Parties and Leaders in the U.S. House.”."
          • Oxford Handbook of American Political Parties and Interest Groups.
          • Ed. Jeffrey Berry and L. Sandy Maisel.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 323-338.
          • John Aldrich, D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Consequences of Electoral and Institutional Change: The Evolution of Conditional Party Government in the U.S. House of Representatives."."
          • New Directions in American Political Parties.
          • Ed. Jeffrey M. Stonecash.
          • Routledge,
          • 2010.
          • 234-250.
          • D.W. Rohde and Meredith Barthelmy.
          • "“The President and Congressional Parties in an Era of Polarization.”."
          • Oxford Handbook of the American Presidency.
          • Ed. George Edwards and William Howel.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
          • (pp. 289-310)
          • John H. Aldrich and D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Congressional Committees in a Continuing Partisan Era.”."
          • Congress Reconsidered, 9th ed..
          • Ed. Lawrence Dodd and Bruce Oppenheimer.
          • CQ Press,
          • 2009.
          • (pp. 217-240)
      • Other

          • Aaron King, Frank Orlando, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Between Introduction and Passage: Amending Activity in the United States Congress."
          • 2012.
          • (A paper prepared for delivery at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association)
          • John H. Aldrich, Bradford H. Bishop, Rebecca S. Hatch, D. Sunshine Hillygu, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Blame, Responsibility, and the Tea Party in the 2010 Midterm Elections."
          • 2012.
          • (A paper presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association)
          • John Aldrich, Aaron S. King, Frank J. Orlando, and D.W. Rohde.
          • "Lending a Hand: A Closer Look at Inter-Branch Relations."
          • 2011.
          • (A paper presented at the2011 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association)
          • Michael C. Brady and D.W. Rohde.
          • "“Moving Beyond Mavericks: Competing Individual Member Vote Misclassifications in the 75th to the 110th Congresses."
          • 2009.
          • (A paper presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association)
          • John H. Aldrich, Brittany Perry and D.W. Rohde.
          • "“House Appropriations After the Republican Revolution.”."
          • 2009.
          • (A paper presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association)
          • Edward H. Stiglitz, D.W. Rohde, and Barry R. Weingast.
          • "Dynamic Congressional Organization: A Theory of Institutional Stability and Reform.”."
          • 2009.
          • (A paper presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association)
      • Books

          • Paul Abramson, John Aldrich, D.W. Rohde.
          • Change and Continuity in the 2008 and 2010 Elections. CQ Press, 2011.
          • 2011.
          • Paul Abramson, John Aldrich, D.W. Rohde.
          • Change and Continuity in the 2008 Elections.
          • Washington, DC:
          • CQ Press,
          • 2010.
    • Rosenberg, Alexander

      • Articles and Chapters

          • A. Rosenberg and William Lane Craig.
          • ""The debate: Is faith in God reasonable?"."
          • Is Faith in God Reasonable? Debates in Philosophy, Science and Rhetoric.
          • Ed. Corey Miller and Paul Gould.
          • Routledge Studies inthe Philosophy of Religion,
          • Routledge,
          • 2014.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Theism and Allism"."
          • The Philosophy of Peter Van Inwagen.
          • Ed. John Christopher Adorno Keller.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2013.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Why I am a naturalist"."
          • The Armchair or the Laboratory.
          • Ed. Matthew Haug.
          • Routledge,
          • 2013.
          • 32-35.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Reply to critics"."
          • Is Faith in God Reasonable? Debates in Philosophy, Science and Rhetoric.
          • Ed. Corey Miller and Paul Gould.
          • Routledge Studies in the Philosophy of Religion,
          • Routledge,
          • 2013.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Can naturalism save the humanities?"."
          • The Armchair or the Laboratory.
          • Ed. Matthew Haug.
          • Routledge,
          • 2013.
          • 39-42.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Disenchanted Naturalism"."
          • Contemporary Philosophical Naturalism and Its Implications.
          • Ed. Bana Bashour and Hans Muller.
          • London:
          • Routledge,
          • 2013.
          • 17-36.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Designing an alternative to the patent as a second best solution to the problem of intellectual property"."
          • New Frontiers in the Philosophy of Intellectual Property.
          • Ed. Annabelle Lever.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • Summer, 2012.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Why do spatiotemporally restricted regularities explain in the social sciences?"."
          • British Journal for Philosophy of Science
          • 63
          • .1
          • (January, 2012)
          • :
          • 1-26.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Br J Philos Sci (2012) 63 (1): 1-26.

          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""How physcis fakes design"."
          • Evolutionary Biology: Coneptual, Ethical Religion Issues.
          • Ed. Thompson and Walsh.
          • Cambridge U.P.,
          • Winter, 2011.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Can nuerophilosophy save the humanities."
          • New York Times
          • (November 6, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Why I am a Naturalist."
          • New York Times
          • (September 17, 2011)
          • .
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Lessons from neurogenomics for cognitive science."
          • Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience.
          • Ed. John Bickle.
          • Oxford University Press,
          • 2009.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Darwinism in moral philosophy and social theory."
          • The Cambridge Companion to Darwin, 2d Edition.
          • Ed. G. Raddick and J. Hodge.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2009.
      • Papers Accepted

          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Reflexivity, Uncertainty and the Unity of Science."
          • Review of Economic Methodology
          • (Winter, 2013)
          • :
          • 14.
          • A. Rosenberg and Marc Lange.
          • ""Can there be a priori causal models of natural selection"."
          • Australasian Journal of Philosophy
          • 89
          • (November 3, 2011)
          • :
          • 591-99.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg and Karen Neander.
          • ""Solving the circularity problem for functions"."
          • Journal of Philosophy
          • (Summer, 2011)
          • .
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Bill Wimsatt, Hegfox."
          • Biology and Philosophy
          • .
      • Books

          • A. Rosenberg.
          • Philosphy of Science: A Contemporary Approach, Second Edition, portuguese translation.
          • Sao Paulo, Brazil:
          • Edicioes Loyola,
          • Summer, 2013.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Approach, Japanese translation.
          • 2011.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Approach, Arabic translation.
          • 2011.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • The Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Approach, 3d Edition, revised, enlarged.
          • Routledge,
          • 2011.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • The Atheist's Guide to Reality.
          • W.W. Norton,
          • 2011.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction--Portuguese translation.
          • 2009.
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • Philosophy of Social Science, 4th edition revised, enlarged.
          • Westview press,
      • Papers Published

          • A. Rosenberg and Tyler Curtain.
          • ""What is economics good for?"."
          • The New York Times,
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Free markets and the myth of earned inequalities"."
          • 3AM Magazine
          • (2013)
          • .
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""How Jerry Fodor slid down the slippery slope to AntiDarwinism, and how we can avid the same fate"."
          • European Journal for the Philosophy of Science
          • 2
          • .2
          • (May, 2012)
          • :
          • 1-17.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg and K. Neander.
          • "Are homolgies function free?."
          • Philosophy of Science
          • 76
          • .3
          • (December, 2009)
          • :
          • 1-39.
      • Papers Submitted

          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""From rational choice to reflexivity"."
          • Economic Thought (on-line)
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 32.
          • [web]
      • Other

          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Atheist's Guide to Reality--Audiobook."
          • Audible.com,
          • 2013.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg and Owen Flanagan.
          • "Alex Rosenberg and Owen Flanagan on naturalism."
          • Fall, 2011.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • ""Rosenberg on the nature of economics"."
          • Library of Economics and Liberty,
          • 2011.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "Alex Rosenberg and John Dupre on reductionism, Philosophy TV."
          • September, 2010.
          • [web]
          • A. Rosenberg.
          • "The disenchanted naturalist's guide to reality."
          • 2009.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          An invited 4400 word article for the National Humanities Center "On the human" web site.

          • A. Rosenberg and Donald Levine.
          • "Blogging heads on Economics as a Science."
          • 2009.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          A one hour discussion of the nature and prospects for economics with a well-known economist in a discussion format, afterward placed on line.

    • Shi, Tianjian

      • Books

          • T. Shi.
          • The Logic of Politics in Mainland China and Taiwan: A Cultural Basis of Attitudes and Behavior.
          • 2011.
      • Journal Articles

          • T. Shi and Jie Lu.
          • "The Meaning of Democracy: The Shadow of Confucianism."
          • Journal of Democracy
          • 21
          • .4
          • (October, 2010)
          • :
          • 123-29.
          Publication Description

          Scholars have been puzzled by the high level of support for democracy, as well as the high level of support for the authoritarian regime, in China, as revealed in numerous surveys. In this paper, Shi and Lu argue that people in different societies may understand democracy in distinct ways. Confucian culture defines democracy in terms of Minben, which is different from the procedural understanding of democracy following the liberal tradition. These two definitions generate different expectations for the government, provide varying standards for assessing political legitimacy, and define distinct functions of participation. Their findings suggest that meaningful comparative studies of support for democracy require scholars to be sensitive to culturally embedded understandings of democracy in different societies.

          • T. Shi and Diqing Lou.
          • "Subjective Evaluation of Changes in Civil Liberties and Political Rights in China."
          • Journal of Contemporary China
          • 19
          • .63
          • (January, 2010)
          • :
          • 175-99.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This paper examines the subjective evaluation of the changes and continuity in status of civil liberties and political rights by ordinary people in China. Our analysis, based on survey data, reveals that an absolute majority of people believe that both civil liberty and political freedom in China have improved significantly since 1979. To verify the validity of the survey findings, we analyze the contents of People’s Daily, the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party in 1976, 1978, 1988 and 2002. We found that People’s Daily, the most conservative newspaper in China, published an increasing number of critical articles about the government. Its criticism not only challenged individual officials but also the fundamental development strategy adopted by the CCP. In content analysis, we also trace how four key terms – democracy, freedom, human rights, and religion – were employed in People’s Daily. The analysis shows that the official rhetoric appearing in People’s Daily exhibited a steady positive trend in describing these terms. We conclude our discussion by analyzing those who are more likely to perceive civil liberties and political rights as improved over time in China. The analysis reveals that those with a better education and a higher income are more likely to perceive positive changes in Chinese society.

          • with
          • Jie Lu and T. Shi.
          • "Rural Elections in China: Mobilization or Learning?."
          • Comparative Politics
          • 42
          • .1
          • (October, 2009)
          • :
          • 103-20.
          Publication Description

          How do people in authoritarian societies respond to the introduction of semi-competitive elections? Conventional wisdom suggests that once elections are introduced into an authoritarian society, people will quickly grasp the newly available opportunity to pursue their interests. The responses of people in rural China to the introduction of village elections seem to be different from what this conventional model assumes. Many peasants hesitated to vote when elections were available for the first time in their political lives. A two-stage political learning model captures people's responses to electoral reform, and survey data collected from China at both the individual and village levels in 2002 examine the model’s validity.

      • Chapters in Books

          • T. Shi.
          • "Is There an Asian Value? Popular Understanding of Democracy in Asia."
          • China's Reform at 30: Challenges and Prospects.
          • Ed. Dali Yang and Iitao Zhao.
          • Singapore:
          • World Scientific Publishing Company,
          • February, 2009.
      • Other

          • T. Shi.
          • "Avoiding Mutual Misunderstanding: Sino-U.S. Relations and the New Administration."
          • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace,
          • January, 2009.
    • Siegel, David A.

      • Books

          • Moore, Will H and Siegel, David A.
          • A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2013.
    • Siegel, David

      • Book Reviews

          • Siegel, David A.
          • Voter Turnout: A Social Theory of Political Participation. By Meredith Rolfe.(Cambridge University Press, 2012.).
          • The Journal of Politics
          • 75
          • .01
          • (2013)
          • .
      • Journal Articles

          • Gaskins, Ben and Golder, Matt and Siegel, David A.
          • "Religious Participation, Social Conservatism, and Human Development."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 75
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 1125--1141.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "Will You Accept the Government's Friend Request? Social Networks and Privacy Concerns."
          • PloS one
          • 8
          • .11
          • Public Library of Science,
          • (2013)
          • :
          • e80682.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "Social Networks and the Mass Media."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 107
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 786--805.
          • Gaskins, Ben and Golder, Matt and Siegel, David A.
          • "Religious Participation and Economic Conservatism."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • 57
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 823--840.
          • Golder, Matt and Golder, Sona N and Siegel, David A.
          • "Modeling the institutional foundations of parliamentary government formation."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 74
          • .2
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 427--445.
          • Shapiro, Jacob N and Siegel, David A.
          • "Moral hazard, discipline, and the management of terrorist organizations."
          • World Politics
          • 64
          • .1
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 39--78.
          • Baybeck, Brady and Berry, William D and Siegel, David A.
          • "A strategic theory of policy diffusion via intergovernmental competition."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 73
          • .1
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 232--47.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "When does repression work? Collective action in social networks."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 73
          • .1
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 232--47.
          • Block, Ray and Siegel, David A.
          • "Identity, bargaining, and third-party mediation."
          • International Theory
          • 3
          • .3
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 416--449.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "Non-Disruptive Tactics of Suppression Are Superior in Countering Terrorism, Insurgency, and Financial Panics."
          • PloS one
          • 6
          • .4
          • Public Library of Science,
          • (2011)
          • :
          • e18545.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "Social networks in comparative perspective."
          • PS: Political Science and Politics
          • 44
          • .1
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 51.
          • Shapiro, Jacob N and Siegel, David A.
          • "Is this paper dangerous? Balancing secrecy and openness in counterterrorism."
          • Security Studies
          • 19
          • .1
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 66--98.
          • Bendor, Jonathan and Kumar, Sunil and Siegel, David A.
          • "Adaptively Rational Retrospective Voting."
          • Journal of Theoretical Politics
          • 22
          • .1
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 26--63.
          • Siegel, David A and Young, Joseph K.
          • "Simulating terrorism: Credible commitment, costly signaling, and strategic behavior."
          • PS: Political Science & Politics
          • 42
          • .4
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 765--771.
          • Siegel, David A.
          • "Social networks and collective action."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • 53
          • .1
          • Wiley Online Library,
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 122--138.
          • Bendor, Jonathan Brodie and Kumar, Sunil and Siegel, David A.
          • "Satisficing: A 'Pretty Good' Heuristic."
          • The BE Journal of Theoretical Economics
          • 9
          • .1
          • (2009)
          • .
      • Books

          • Bendor, Jonathan and Diermeier, Daniel and Siegel, David A and Ting, Michael M.
          • A behavioral theory of elections.
          • Princeton University Press,
          • 2011.
    • Soskice, David

      • Journal Articles

          • with
          • Torben Iversen.
          • "Real Exchange Rates and Competitiveness: The Political Economic Foundations of Comparative Advantage."
          • American Political Science Review
          • (August, 2010)
          • .
          • with
          • Tom Cusack and Torben Iversen.
          • "The Coevolution of Capitalism and Political Representation: Explaining the Choice of Electoral Systems."
          • American Political Science Review
          • (May, 2010)
          • .
          • with
          • Sam Abrams and Torben Iversen,.
          • "Informal Social Networks and Rational Voting."
          • British Journal of Political Science
          • (Forthcoming)
          • .
          • with
          • Torben Iversen.
          • "With Torben Iversen, “Distribution and Redistribution: the Shadow of the Nineteenth Century.."
          • World Politics
          • (July, 2009)
          • .
          • with
          • Ben Ross Schneider.
          • "Inequality in Developed Countries and Latin America: Coordinated, Liberal and Hierarchical Systems,."
          • Economy and Society.
          • (February, 2009)
          • .
          • with
          • Wendy Carlin.
          • "German Economic Performance: Disentangling the Role of Supply-Side Reforms, Macroeconomic Policy and Coordinated Economic Institutions,."
          • Socio-Economic Review
          • (January, 2009)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • D. Soskice.
          • "American Exceptionalism and Comparative Political Economy."
          • The Great Unraveling: New Labor Market Institutions and Public Policy Responses.
          • Ed. Clair Brown, Barry Eichengreen and Michael Reich.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 51-93.
    • Spragens, Thomas A

      • Journal Articles

          • with
          • Bruce Miroff.
          • "Critical Dialogue."
          • Perspectives on Politics
          • .
          • Ed. Jeffrey Isaac.
          • Vol. 8
          • .No. 2
          • American Political Science Association,
          • (June, 2010)
          • :
          • 617-23.
    • Spragens, Thomas

      • Books

          • T.A. Spragens.
          • Getting the Left Right: The Transformation, Decline, and Reformation of American Liberalism.
          • Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas,
          • 2009.
    • Trejo, Guillermo

      • Books

          • G. Trejo.
          • Indigenous Insurgency: The Breakdown of Religious and Political Monopolies and the Rise of Ethnic Mobilization in Mexico.
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • Expected publication, 2011.
          • (Under Contract).
      • Chapters in Books

          • G. Trejo.
          • "Violencia y politica en el Mexico del Bicentenario: Causas y consecuencias de la primera crisis de la democracia."
          • Historia Critica de las Modernizaciones en Mexico: Presente y Perspectivas.
          • Ed. R. Cordera,.
          • CIDE and Fondo de Cultura Economica,
          • 2010.
          Publication Description

          This is the closing chapter of a five-volume series on Mexico's three major attempts at economic and political modernization in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. The series brings together leading economic and political historians from Mexico, the U.S. and Western Europe.

      • Journal Articles

          • G. Trejo.
          • "Religious Competition and Ethnic Mobilization in Latin America: Why the Catholic Church Promotes Indigenous Movements in Mexico."
          • American Political Science Review
          • 103
          • .3
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • (August, 2009)
          • :
          • 323-342.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This article suggests that a society’s religious market structure can explain whether religion is “the opium of the people” or a major source of dissident secular mobilization. I present a simple model explaining why under monopolistic conditions, Catholic clergy in Latin America ignored the religious and social needs of poor rural indigenous parishioners but, when confronted by the expansion of U.S. mainline Protestantism, became major institutional promoters of rural indigenous causes. Catholic indigenous parishioners empowered by competition demanded the same benefits their Protestant neighbors were receiving: social services, ecclesiastic decentralization, and the practice of religion in their own language. Unable to decentralize ecclesiastic hierarchies, and facing a reputation deficit for having sided with rich and powerful elites for centuries, Catholic clergy stepped into the secular realm and became active promoters of indigenous movements and ethnic identities; they embraced the cause of the Indians as a member retention strategy and not in response to new doctrinal ideas emanating from Vatican II. Drawing on an original data set of indigenous mobilization in Mexico and on life histories and case studies, I provide quantitative and qualitative evidence of the causal effect of religious competition on the creation of the social bases for indigenous ethnic mobilization.

    • Vanberg, Georg

      • Papers Accepted

          • G. Vanberg and Justin Fox.
          • "“Narrow versus Broad Judicial Opinions.”."
          • Journal of Theoretical Politics
          • (Forthcoming)
          • .
      • Edited Volumes

          • G. Vanberg and Lanny Martin, eds.
          • "“Legislative Institutions and Coalition Government.”."
          • Oxford Handbook of Legislative Studies.
          • Ed. Thomas Saalfeld, Kaare Strøm, and Shane Martin.
          • Oxford Univeristy Press,
          • Forthcoming.
          • G. Vanberg and Viktor Vanberg, eds.
          • Towards a (re-)integration of the social sciences: The Calculus of Consent at 50..
          • Public Choice
          • 152
          • (2012)
          • 245-252.
          • G. Vanberg, eds.
          • The Will of the People: A Comparative Perspective on Friedman..
          • Michigan State Law Review
          • 2010
          • (2010)
          • 717-728.
      • Journal Articles

          • G. Vanberg and Lanny Martin.
          • "Multiparty Government, Fiscal Institutions, and Public Spending.”."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 75
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 953-67.
          • G. Vanberg, Cliff Carrubba, Barry Friedman, and Andrew D. Martin.
          • "Who Controls the Content of Supreme Court Opinions?."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • 56
          • (2012)
          • :
          • 400-412.
          • G. Vanberg.
          • "Substance vs. Procedure: Constitutional Enforcement and Constitutional Choice."
          • Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization
          • 80
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 309-318.
          • G. Vanberg and Erik Engstrom.
          • "Assessing the Partisan Allocation of Pork: Evidence from Congressional Earmarks."
          • American Politics Research
          • 38
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 958-985.
          • G. Vanberg, Kevin McGuire, Gregory Caldeira, and Charles Smith.
          • "Measuring Policy Content on the U.S. Supreme Court."
          • Journal of Politics
          • 71
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 1305-1321.
      • Books

          • G. Vanberg and Lanny Martin.
          • Parliaments and Coalitions: The Role of Legislatures in Multiparty Governance.
          • Oxford Univeristy Press,
          • 2011.
    • Ward, Michael D.

      • Journal Articles

          • Kristin M. Bakke, John V.O'Loughlin, Gerard O'Tuathail, and M.D. WARD.
          • "Convincing State-Builders? Disaggregating Internal Legitimacy in Abkhazia."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 58
          • .3
          • (September, 2014)
          • .
    • Ward, Michael

      • Journal Articles

          • Cassy L. Dorff and M.D. WARD.
          • "Networks, Dyads, and the Social Relations Model."
          • Political Science Research Methods
          • 1
          • .2
          • (December, 2013)
          • :
          • 159-178.
          • [web]
          • Nils W. Metternich C. Dorff, M. Gallop, S. Weschle & M.D. WARD.
          • "Anti-Government Networks in Civil Conflicts; How Network Structures Affect Conflictual Behavior."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • 57
          • .4
          • (October, 2013)
          • :
          • 777-1028.
          • M.D. WARD, John S. Ahlquist, and Arturas Rozenas.
          • "Gravity's Rainbow: A Dynamic Latent Space Model for the World Trade Network."
          • Network Science
          • 1
          • .1
          • (March, 2013)
          • :
          • 95-118.
          • Jacob M. Montgomery, Florian M. Hollenbach, and M.D. WARD.
          • "Aggregation and Ensembles: Principled Combinations of Data."
          • PS: Political Science & Politics
          • 46
          • .1
          • (January, 2013)
          • :
          • 43-44.
          • M.D. WARD and Nils Metternich and Cassy Dorff and Max Gallop and Florian Hollenbach and Anna Schultz and Simon Weschle.
          • "Learning from the Past and Stepping into the Future: The Next Generation of Crisis Prediction."
          • International Studies Review
          • 15
          • .4
          • (2013)
          • :
          • tbd.
          • Xun Cao and M.D. WARD.
          • "Do Democracies Attract Portfolio Investment? Transnational Portfolio Investments Modeled as Dynamic Network."
          • International Interactions
          • 39
          • .1
          • (2013 in press)
          • :
          • in press.
          • Kristian Skrede Gleditsch and M.D. WARD.
          • "Forecasting is Difficult, Especially about the Future: Using Contentious Issues to Forecast Interstate Disputes."
          • Journal of Peace Research
          • 50
          • .1
          • (2013)
          • :
          • 17-31.
          • M.D. Ward and Adrian E. Raftery.
          • "Special Issue on Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences."
          • Statistical Methodology
          • 8
          • Elsevier,
          • (2010)
          • .
          • M.D. Ward and Nils B. Weidmann.
          • "Predicting Conflict in Space and Time."
          • Journal of Conflict Resolution
          • 54
          • .5
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 1-19.
          • M.D. Ward, Katherine Stovel, & Audrey Sacks.
          • "Network Analysis and Political Science."
          • Annual Review of Political Science
          • .
          • Ed. Margaret Levi.
          • tba
          • (2010)
          • .
          • Brian D. Greenhill, M.D. Ward, & K. M. Bakke.
          • "Perils of Policy by P-Value: Predicting Civil Conflicts."
          • Journal of Peace Research
          • 47
          • .4
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 1-13.
          • K.M. Bakke, X. Cao, J. V. O'Loughlin & M.D. Ward.
          • "Social Distance in Bosnia and the North Caucasus Region of Russia: Inter-and intra-ethnic attitudes and identities.."
          • Nations and Nationalism
          • 15
          • .2
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 227-253.
          • K.M. Bakke, J. V. O'Loughlin, & M.D. Ward.
          • "Reconciliation in Conflict-Affected Societies: Multilevel Modeling of Individual and Contextual Factors in the North Caucasus of Russia."
          • Annals of the American Association of Geographers
          • 99
          • .5
          • (2009)
          • :
          • 1012-1021.
      • Chapters in Books

          • M.D. WARD, Cassy L. Dorff.
          • "Les réseaux, les dyades et le modèle des relations sociales."
          • Liber amicorum: Hommage en l'honneur du Professeur Jacques Fontanel.
          • Ed. Liliane Perrin-Bensahel and Jean-Francois Guilhaudis.
          • Paris:
          • L'Harmattan,
          • March, 2013.
          • 271-288.
          • M.D. Ward.
          • "Statistical Analysis of International Interdependencies.."
          • International Studies Encyclopaedic Compendium:.
          • Ed. Paul F. Diehl and James D. Morrow.
          • Scientific Studies of International Proc
          • .10
          • New York:
          • Cambridge University Press,
          • 2010.
          • 6615-6628.
          • M.D. Ward & P.D. Hoff.
          • "Analyzing Dependencies in Geo-Politics and Geo-Economics."
          • Contributions to Conflict Management, Peace Economics and Development.
          • Ed. Jacques Fontanel and Manas Chatterji.
          • 6
          • London, UIK.:
          • Emerald Publishing (Elsevier),
          • 2009.
          • 133-160.
      • Books

          • M.D. Ward and K.S. Gleditsch.
          • Spatial Regression Models (in Chinese).
          • Sage Publications & Truth and Wisdom Press,
          • 2012.
    • Wibbels, Erik

      • Books

          • E. Wibbels.
          • Trade, Development and Social Insurance.
          • Forthcoming.
      • Papers Accepted

          • E. Wibbels, T. Gift.
          • "Reading, Writing, and the Regrettable State of Education Research in Comparative Politics."
          • Annual Review of Political Science
          • (Forthcoming, 2014)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, H. McGee.
          • "The Geography of Governance in Africa: Recent Evidence from Satellites, Field Experiments and Other New Sources."
          • Federal and Regional Studies
          • (Forthcoming, 2014)
          • .
      • Papers Published

          • E. Wibbels, D. Christensen.
          • "Labor Standards, Trade and the Evolution of Inequality"."."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • (April, 2013)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, P. Beramendi, B. Barber.
          • ""The Behavioral Foundations of Social Policy: Risk and Redistribution in a Laboratory Democracy"."
          • Comparative Political Studies
          • (February, 2013)
          • .
      • Papers Submitted

          • E. Wibbels, M. Ward, F. Hollenbach.
          • "State Building and the Geography of Governance."
          • International Organization
          • (Under Review)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, J. Pierskalla, A. Schultz.
          • "Order, Geography and Development."
          • World Politics
          • (Under Review)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, P. Beramendi.
          • "Foundational Bargains: Distributive Conflicts and Representation in the Birth of Federations."
          • Economics and Politics
          • (Under Review)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, E. Goldberg.
          • "The Geography of Natural Resources and Development."."
          • World Politics
          • (2011)
          • .
      • Chapters in Books

          • D. Rueda, E. Wibbels, M. Altamirano.
          • "The Origins of Dualization."
          • The Future of Democratic Capitalism.
          • Forthcoming.
      • Journal Articles

          • E. Wibbels and J. Ahlquist.
          • "Inequality, Factor Prices and Political Regimes."
          • American Journal of Political Science
          • (2012)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels and J. Ahlquist.
          • "Development, Trade and Social Insurance."
          • International Studies Quarterly
          • 55
          • (March, 2011)
          • :
          • 125-49.
          • E. Wibbels.
          • "Jonathan Rodden and Erik Wibbels, "Dual accountability and the nationalization of party competition: Evidence from four federations"."
          • Party Politics
          • 17
          • .September
          • (2011)
          • :
          • 629-654.
          • E. Wibbels, J. Rodden.
          • "Fiscal Decentralization and the Business Cycle."
          • Economics and Politics
          • March
          • (March, 2010)
          • :
          • 37-67.
          Publication Description

          Though fiscal policies of central governments sometimes provide modest insurance against regional income shocks, this paper shows that pro-cyclical fiscal policy among provincial governments can easily overwhelm these stabilizing effects. We examine the cyclicality of budget items among provincial governments in eight federations, showing that own-source taxes are highly pro-cyclical and contrary to common wisdom, revenue-sharing and discretionary transfers are either acyclical or pro-cyclical. Constituent governments are thus left alone to smooth their own shocks, even though various restraints on borrowing and saving undermine their ability to do so. These results have important policy implications for Latin America and the European Union, as well as the current economic crisis in the U.S.

          • E. Wibbels and K. Roberts.
          • "The Politics of Economic Crises in Latin America."
          • Studies in Comparative International Development
          • 45
          • (2010)
          • :
          • 383-409.
          Publication Description

          Researchers widely recognize that economic crises have important political consequences, yet there is little systematic research on the political factors that make nations more or less susceptible to economic crisis. Scholars have long debated the economic consequences of party systems, executive powers, and societal interest groups, but their relationships to crisis proclivity are poorly understood. We assess the political correlates of economic crisis using a cross-sectional time-series analysis of 17 Latin American countries over nearly three decades. Crises are measured along two dimensions—depth and duration—and disaggregated into three types: inflationary, GDP, and fiscal crises. Statistical results suggest that political institutions have a modest, and often unexpected, correlation with crises. More important than institutional attributes are social organization and the nature of party-society linkages, particularly the existence of a densely-organized trade union movement and/or a powerful leftist party. Strong unions and powerful parties of the left are associated with more severe economic crises, though there is some evidence that the combination of left-labor strength can alleviate inflationary crises. The results demonstrate the need to disaggregate the concept of economic crisis and incorporate the societal dimension when studying the political economy of crisis and reform.

          • E. Wibbels.
          • "Cores, Peripheries and Contemporary Political Economy."
          • Studies in Comparative International Development
          • 44
          • .4
          • (December, 2009)
          • :
          • 441-49.
      • Other

          • E. Wibbels.
          • "A Federal Bailout for the States."
          • San Diego Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Raleigh News and Observer
          • (January 22, 2009)
          • .
          • E. Wibbels, J. Pierskalla.
          • "Natural Resources and Human Development in the American States."
          • 2009.
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