Mathew D. McCubbins

Mathew D. McCubbins

Ruth F. DeVarney Professor of Political Science in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences

External Address: 
Duke Law School 210 Science Dr, Duke Box 90362, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Duke Law School, Duke Box 90362, Durham, NC 27708
Phone: 
(919) 613-7006
Specialties: 
Political Economy

McCubbins is perhaps best known for the argument that legislative majorities, whether they be the dominant legislative party or a coalition parties governments (even supported minority coalitions) usurp the power resident in the legislature for their own purposes. Within busy legislatures, legislation is controlled as a consequence of a party or coalition of parties capturing control of key legislative assets, such as congressional committee in the US Congress, which because of the rules have blocking (or veto power) and thus serve as a gateway (or gate) to discussion of a bill by the full plenum. The legislative process is replete with gates that are both subtle and gross. All other powers to set the agenda arise as a consequence of creating and controlling the legislative process.

Education

  • Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 1983

McCubbins, M, and Cox, G. "Fiscal Policy and Divided Government." The Politics of Divided Government. Westview Press, 1991. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Page, T. "A Theory of Congressional Delegation." Congress: Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. 409-425. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Sullivan, T. "Introduction: Institutional Aspects of Decision Processes." Congress: Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Sullivan, T. "Representation." Congress: Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Sullivan, T. "The Shape of Congressional Institutions." Congress: Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Sullivan, T. "The Impact of Institutional Arrangements: Implications for the Study of Congress." Congress:Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. (Chapter)

McCubbins, M, and Sullivan, T. "The Impact of Institutional Arrangements on the Development of Public Policy." Congress: Structure and Policy. Cambridge University Press, 1987. (Chapter)

Lake, DA, and McCubbins, MD. "The logic of delegation to international organizations." Delegation and Agency in International Organizations.: Cambridge University Press.. 341-368. Full Text

Pages

McCubbins, M, and Lax, J. "Courts, Congress and Public Policy, Part II: The Impact of the Reappointment Revolution on Urban and Rural Interests." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 15 (2006): 199-218.

McCubbins, M. "Conditions for Judicial Independence." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 15 (2006): 105-128.

McCubbins, M, and Rodriguez, D. "When Does Deliberating Improve Decision Making?." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 15 (2006): 9-50.

McCubbins, M, Boudreau, C, and Rodriguez, D. "Statutory Interpretation and The Intentional(ist) Stance." Loyola Law Review 38 (2006): 2131-2146.

McCubbins, M, Barrett, C, Gibson, C, and Hoffman, B. "The Complex Links Between Governance and Biodiversity." Conservation Biology 20 (2006): 1358-1366.

McCubbins, M, Chandler, W, and Cox, G. "Agenda Control in the Bundestag, 1980-2002." German Politics 15 (2006): 27-48.

McCubbins, M, and Kousser, T. "Social Choice, Crypto-Initiatives and Policy Making by Direct Democracy." Southern California Law Review 78 (2005): 949-984.

McCubbins, M, and Lupia, A. "Lost in Translation: Social Change Theory is Misapplied Against Legislative Intent." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 14 (2005): 585-617.

McCubbins, M, and Rodriguez, D. "Canonical Construction and Statutory Revisionism: The Strange Case of the Appropriations Canon." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 14 (2005): 669-715.

McCubbins, M, and Rodriguez, D. "What is New in the New Statutory Interpretation? Introduction to The Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues Symposium." Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 14 (2005): 535-547.

Pages