Scott de Marchi

Scott de Marchi

Professor of Political Science

External Address: 
140 Science Drive, 294F Gross, Box 90204, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Box 90204, Durham, NC 27708-0204
Phone: 
(919) 660-4342
Specialties: 
American Politics, Behavior Identities, Methods, Political Economy, Political Institutions, Security, Peace, Conflict

His work focuses on mathematical methods, especially computational social science, machine learning, and mixed methods. Substantively, he examines individual decision-making in contexts that include the American Congress and presidency, bargaining in legislatures, interstate conflict, and voting behavior. He has been an external fellow at the Santa Fe Institute and the National Defense University and is currently a principal investigator for NSF’s EITM program.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1998
  • M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1993
  • B.A., Wake Forest University 1990

de Marchi, Scott, and James T. Hamilton. You Are What You Choose. Penguin, 2009.

de Marchi, S. Computational and mathematical modeling in the social sciences. Vol. 9780521853620, 2005, pp. 1–197. Scopus, doi:10.1017/CBO9780511510588. Full Text

de Marchi, S., and S. E. Page. “Agent-Based Modeling.” The Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology, 2008. Scopus, doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199286546.003.0004. Full Text

de Marchi, S., and S. Page. “Computational and Agent Based Models.” Oxford Handbook of Political Science Methodology, 2008.

de Marchi, S., et al. “Party and Constituency in the U.S. Senate, 1933-2004.” Why Not Parties?, University of Chicago Press, 2008.

de Marchi, S. “A Computational Model of Voter Sophistication, Ideology and Candidate Position taking.” Computational Models in Political Economy, edited by Ken Kollman et al., MIT Press, 2003.

Cutler, J., et al. “Cabinet Formation and Portfolio Distribution in European Multiparty Systems.” British Journal of Political Science, vol. 46, no. 1, Feb. 2014, pp. 31–43. Scopus, doi:10.1017/S0007123414000180. Full Text

De Marchi, S., and S. E. Page. “Agent-based models.” Annual Review of Political Science, vol. 17, Jan. 2014, pp. 1–20. Scopus, doi:10.1146/annurev-polisci-080812-191558. Full Text

Sullivan, T., and S. De Marchi. “Congressional bargaining in presidential time: Give and take, anticipation, and the constitutional rationalization of dead ducks.” Journal of Politics, vol. 73, no. 3, July 2011, pp. 748–63. Scopus, doi:10.1017/S0022381611000430. Full Text

Laver, M., et al. “Negotiation in legislatures over government formation.” Public Choice, vol. 147, no. 3–4, June 2011, pp. 285–304. Scopus, doi:10.1007/s11127-010-9627-4. Full Text

Laver, M., et al. “Negotiation in legislatures over government formation.” Public Choice, vol. 147, no. 3/4, 2011, pp. 285–304. Manual, doi:10.2307/41483661. Full Text

Ensley, M. J., et al. “District complexity as an advantage in congressional elections.” American Journal of Political Science, vol. 53, no. 4, Oct. 2009, pp. 990–1005. Scopus, doi:10.1111/j.1540-5907.2009.00412.x. Full Text

de Marchi, S., et al. “Costly Search and the Advantages of Incumbency: Some Experimental Results.” Public Choice, Springer Verlag, 2008.

Ensley, M. J., et al. “Candidate uncertainty, mental models, and complexity: Some experimental results.” Public Choice, vol. 132, no. 1–2, July 2007, pp. 231–46. Scopus, doi:10.1007/s11127-007-9149-x. Full Text

Ensley, M. J., et al. “Candidate Uncertainty, Mental Models, and Complexity: Some Experimental Results.” Public Choice, vol. 132, no. 1–2, 2007, pp. 231–46. Manual, doi:10.2307/27698137. Full Text

Pages

Selected Grants

SBAR Cambodia Res+ awarded by The Cloudburst Group (Co-Principal Investigator). 2019 to 2020

CNH-Ex: Balancing Water Needs and Water Uses for Humans and Nature awarded by National Science Foundation (Co-Principal Investigator). 2013 to 2017

Empirical Implications of Theoretical Models (EITM) awarded by University of Michigan (Principal Investigator). 2015 to 2016

Empirical Implications of Theoretical Models (EITM) awarded by University of Michigan (Principal Investigator). 2015 to 2016

EITM Summer Training Institute awarded by University of Michigan (Principal Investigator). 2013 to 2015

REU in Political Science: Ralph Bunche Summer Institute awarded by National Science Foundation (Co-Principal Investigator). 2012 to 2013

REU Site: Ralph Bunche Summer Institute awarded by National Science Foundation (Co-Principal Investigator). 2000 to 2012

Assessing the Accuracy of Self-reported Pollution Data awarded by National Science Foundation (Co-Principal Investigator). 2002 to 2004